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Wounded in Action features art by soldiers, doctors, and family members who know war injuries far too well.

How would your life would change if you lost a limb? What if you had to stop playing a sport you enjoy or depend more on your family for help with daily activities? Would you adapt to the loss or fall into depression and resentment? For soldiers in battle, such questions aren’t hypothetical—they’re everyday workplace […]

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Adrian Tomine & Seth

Adrian Tomine and Seth (aka Gregory Gallant) are two of the most celebrated comic artists of the moment, both welcomed into the New Yorker’s fold while still widely adored by the fans who’ve followed their work for more than a decade. In the latest installment of Tomine’s serial Optic Nerve, a young Asian-American movie theater […]

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Adelheid Mers

Adelheid Mers first became known for multicolored light projections, but since 2000 she’s been creating some of the most original art I’ve seen–large digital diagrams that elucidate ideas in books that have engaged her. Three untitled diagrams from her series “Images After George Lakoff: Moral Politics–How Liberals and Conservatives Think” are now on view at […]

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Adrian Tomine

Though he just turned 30, Adrian Tomine is an old hand at cartooning. As a teenager in 1991 he started xeroxing his Optic Nerve comic book in print runs of 25 to be dropped off at Sacramento bookstores. At 17 he had a regular strip in Tower Records’ Pulse! magazine, and by 1994 Optic Nerve […]

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Alex Ross & Chip Kidd

Even if you’re not a comic book fan, you could easily be impressed and entertained by Mythology: The DC Comics Art of Alex Ross. If you are a fan, it’ll blow you away. Written and designed by the equally celebrated Chip Kidd, Mythology is part Ross bio and homage, part history of cartoon illustration, and […]

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Adolph Gottlieb

Chicago is rich in alternative galleries featuring work by recent art-school grads but poor in exhibitions of seldom-seen work by famous artists–the kind that are common in New York and Los Angeles. A new gallery, Valerie Carberry, has stepped into the breach with the first Adolph Gottlieb show in Chicago in 36 years, focusing on […]

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Alladeen

The Builders Association, a New York-based experimental company founded by former Wooster Group dramaturge Marianne Weems, made its Chicago debut almost two years ago with Xtravaganza, a trippy homage to producer Florenz Ziegfeld, director Busby Berkeley, dancer Loie Fuller, and designer Steele MacKaye. For her troupe’s return engagement Weems has joined forces with designers Keith […]

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Abstraction’s Other Voice

This exhibit, the first in a series focusing on “women painters dealing with abstraction,” includes three paintings by Chicago-area native Caroline Peters–two of them airy, almost lyrical combinations of inspired lines and translucent paint smears. Double Brink centers on a wheellike shape, with charcoal lines for the spokes and washes of acrylic around the rim. […]