Posted inNews & Politics

On Ivan Albright

It’s difficult to trace the origins of the “Chicago School,” but that the city spawned an imagery of its own there is no doubt. The earliest traces I can detect are in the work of Ivan Albright in the late 1920s….Albright and I were next-door neighbors at 55 and 53 East Division Street, respectively, from […]

Posted inNews & Politics

On Bad Architecture

The sad fact is that those with the power to effect change are usually those with the worst taste….Bad architecture, the offspring of powerful, arrogant, tasteless people, has not only created a tacky atmosphere, like most bad choices it has proved more expensive than good choices. I suspect the same thing will prove true with […]

Posted inNews & Politics

On the Art Institute

In 1978 the Art Institute hired a new director, Alan Shestack, from the Yale Art Gallery. When Shestack declined the job a few days after his appointment was announced in the press, it was reported that his wife didn’t want to move to Chicago. There was considerable speculation at the time that Shestack actually turned […]

Posted inNews & Politics

On Francis Bacon

The 1959 Francis Bacon exhibition was popular with Chicago artists like George Cohen, Leon Golub, Seymour Rosofsky, and Cosmo Campoli, though not particularly with the collectors. Bacon’s work had been exhibited only once before in the United States, in a small exhibition at Durlacher Brothers in New York in 1953. I had never met Bacon, […]

Posted inNews & Politics

On the Case of Gregory Green

My Chicago gallery, Feigen Inc., whose cutting-edge program, although enthusiastically subscribed to by me, was determined by the young codirectors, Lance Kinz and Susan Reynolds, had opened a summer group exhibition on June 23, 1995. Among the 24 artists in the show, there was a young Brooklyn conceptual sculptor, Gregory Green. Green, a pacifist, makes […]

Posted inNews & Politics

On Class Oldenburg

In those years that we showed Claes Oldenburg in Chicago, I always wanted to place a large outdoor piece in his hometown. When the Latin School, of whose 1946 football team Oldenburg had been a star, moved to its new location on North Avenue, I talked to the architect, Harry Weese, about placing an Oldenburg […]