* The new downtown Reckless Records is now open. The selection was slim when I checked it out on Thursday, but I appreciated their $3 pricing for Robert Palmer: Addictions Vol. 1.

* Lynn Becker reports that Chicago is officially freaking out about the Calatrava spire.

* Tix for the CSO’s season finale, Herbert Blomsted conducting Beethoven’s 9th, are going quickly; good seats are almost gone, as I just discovered. I am not too proud to go to the second of three shows, though I still had to settle for separated seats.

* Gapers Block’s gifted Naz Hamid gets included in Step magazine’s Field Guide to Emerging Design (h/t Andrew Huff).

* Time Out discovers that the Alley is moving, notes an awesome-sounding book about Cook County public defenders who specialize in death penalty and life-sentence cases.

* The reunited Son Volt play the Vic on Tuesday, but more important, Jason Isbell is opening. Isbell is the best of the Drive-By Truckers’ outstanding trio of singer-songwriters: not only is he a talented musician but his lyrics are among the best southern writing being done today. Here’s a video of him playing his heartbreaking update of the John Henry myth, “The Day John Henry Died.” Also recommended: “Decoration Day,” a crushing parable of violence.