Godzilla

Mise-en-scene, the art of telling a story through visual composition more than editing, rarely comes up in discussion of Hollywood blockbusters. In the age of green-screen technology and computer graphics, it’s increasingly difficult to distinguish production design from special effects, and even when you can, the settings of these films are typically uninspired. In Peter Jackson’s Tolkien adaptations and in most of the Marvel Studios output (to name two popular examples), the environments never look quite inhabitable, however impressive they may be on a technical level. One can easily imagine walking around in the palpable, richly textured worlds of the original Star Wars trilogy, or the musical spectacles produced by Arthur Freed at MGM in the 40s and 50s (Meet Me in St. Louis, Singin’ in the Rain). But modern-day blockbusters often seem to exist under shrink-wrap, inviting spectators to look but not touch. Continue reading >>