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Posted inArts & Culture

Waiting for Eternity

LATINA ART: SHOWCASE ’87 at the Mexican Fine Arts Center Heroic art hangs here. This show is balm for cynical souls, not just another sop to a minority. Serenity permeates it even as the work confronts evil. You don’t look at Animas colgantes, but down into it as if peering at a dungeon. It’s an […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Blasts From the Past

To the editors: Having finally plowed through Jay Andres’s letter [June 12], I’m afraid I have to prolong the tedious debate on classical radio. Unlike Mr. Reihl and Mr. Andres, I not only like the music of Bach and Brahms better than easy listening, I also believe it is better music. If this means I’m […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Dragnet

Dan Aykroyd and Tom Hanks are the LA police detectives out looking for the facts in this parody update of the old Jack Webb TV series. The old, authoritarian Dragnet was as claustrophobically reined in as this one is comically hung out, though first-time director Tom Mankiewicz (son of All About Eve’s Joseph L.) still […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Our Color-Blind Columnists

To the editors: Imagine my shock to find in your Hot Type column (June 26) that “there are no blacks on the editorial board of either the Sun-Times or Tribune and no blacks in significant decision-making positions.” I have been a member of the Chicago Tribune editorial board since the summer of 1984. The late […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Field & Street

There are two ways to attract a butterfly. One is to put out a bait consisting of elderly fruit–bananas are particularly good–mixed with molasses, beer, and yeast. The other is to piss on the ground. Either smell, urine or rotting fruit, is practically irresistible to your average lepidopteran. I learned of the inelegant tastes of […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Who Made Giselle?

To the editors: I always appreciate Dorothy Samachson’s columns on dance. Her recent notes on the Kirov were no exception [May 22]. I think her pen must have slipped, however, when she attributed the ballet Giselle to choreographer Marius Petipa. As I’m sure she knows, it was choreographed by Jules Perrot and Jean Coralli in […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Normal Heart

First produced last winter at the Next Theatre, Eric Simonson’s passionate staging of The Normal Heart has reopened at the Ivanhoe, which of late has hosted light musical and comedy fare. Normal Heart is anything but–written by gay activist Larry Kramer, it’s a lacerating, deeply serious examination of the individual and social costs of AIDS […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Great Chicago Playwrights Exposition

Those Lincoln Avenue roommates, the Body Politic and Victory Gardens theaters, have lent their two-level performance complex as well as their energies to the task of bringing off this six-week-long 13-playwright showcase for homegrown talents. Productions include two full-length works, three programs of short plays, and a couple of pieces-in-progress (see below for details). Body […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Snooky Pryor

James “Snooky” Pryor’s broad-toned, rhythmic harmonica lent its flowing emotional intensity to some of the most significant blues recordings of the 1940s and ’50s, most notably those by Floyd Jones (“Stockyard Blues,” “Schooldays on My Mind”) and Sunnyland Slim. (“Goin’ Back to Memphis”), and he remains an accomplished purveyor of the music he helped bring […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Anomie in the U.K.

ROAD Remains Theatre Ensemble at the Organic Theater Road is one damn good evening of theater. I don’t get to say that very often; hardly ever. Chicago has dozens of theater companies dedicated, as they say, to presenting new and challenging plays. You hear that claim a lot; but when you get there you often […]