Posted inNews & Politics

Bork’s Mainstream

To the editors: The Reader’s articles on Judge Robert H. Bork’s nomination to the Supreme Court–“The Law: People v. Robert Bork” (August 14) and “Bork! The Tribune’s Pages Sing” [Hot Type, August 28]–tell us about the people predictably lining up on each side of the confirmation fight in Illinois, but they do not adquately explain […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

“Many people have hoped that biotechnology will usher in a new non-chemical era in agriculture,” we read in Not Man Apart (March-April 1987). “Through careful breeding, plants could be made resistant to disease and insects, instead of being doused with a plethora of dangerous and toxic pesticides and herbicides.” No such luck. Scientists at the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Self-Absorption to the Max

To the editors: [Re: “Boomed Out,” by Julie Phillips, July 31] My congratulations and sympathies to your plight as an adolescent in the 80s. First of all, congratulations for your straightforward (shall we call it rebellious?) attitude toward my generation. It’s about time. Many of us boomers were beginning to wonder whether or not your […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Lakeboat

LAKEBOAT Inn Town Players David Mamet’s a Big Name now, there’s no denying it. Broadway hit, Pulitzer prize, Oscar nomination–he’s a certified success. I’ve even come across a book of criticism devoted exclusively to the guy’s work. That’s the kind of treatment reserved for bona fide creators of literature. Everything Mamet writes for the rest […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Another Noise

To the editors: One of my favorite rock ‘n’ roll noises [July 31] occurs during the final four notes of the Doors’ “Touch Me.” It’s mixed low but if you know it’s there you can hear it: Jim Morrison singing “stronger than dirt.” David Williams Somerville, Massachusetts

Posted inNews & Politics

The Cuban Connection

To the editors: I appreciated Robert Heuer’s article on the Irakere Band and its performance at the Chicago Jazz Festival (September 18) for its portrait of the band itself, but Heuer makes a serious omission. It was the Jazz Institute of Chicago, recognizing the exciting international dimension of jazz, which programmed the performances of Cuban […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Colored Museum

THE COLORED MUSEUM Victory Gardens Theater I am surely just one of many people who eagerly anticipated Victory Gardens’s Chicago premiere of The Colored Museum, George C. Wolfe’s off-Broadway success. There was interest in seeing the play itself–a potentially virtuosic series of performance pieces on the theme of black American images. And there was considerable […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Restaurant Tours: surpassing pierogi

In a city where the term Polish restaurant conjures up visions of oilcloth-covered tables, oversized platters piled high with meat, potatoes, and dumplings, iceberg lettuce slathered with bottled dressings, and a rough-and-ready decor in either a storefront or a barnlike enclosure, Mareva’s offers a welcome alternative. Chicago’s newest purveyor of la cuisine polonaise is a […]

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The Sports Section

It wasn’t Ted Williams hitting a home run in his last at-bat, and it wasn’t Babe Ruth hitting three homers in one of his final games, with the Boston Braves. It was, however, the most moving event of this quickly passing baseball season, perhaps the most moving event on the Chicago sports scene this year. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Candied Portraits, Potent Charms

CHICAGO CITY BALLET at the Chicago Theatre JOSEPH HOLMES DANCE THEATRE at the Auditorium Theatre Boosters rarely create great art. Moreover, their efforts usually backfire. And unfortunately the new jazz dance Chicago!, choreographed by Joel Hall for the Chicago City Ballet, does our city a disservice, largely because it tries so hard to serve it. […]