Posted inArts & Culture

Trashvision!

TRASHVISION! BDI Theater Company at Chicago Actors Ensemble I happened to see “Trashvision!” on the same day I read of Douglas Edwards’s death. Edwards was the first network news anchor–he headed CBS’s national news broadcast from 1948 until he retired and was replaced by Walter Cronkite. The newspaper obituaries for Edwards carried comments about his […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Female Futures

EMILY Goose Island Theatre at the Avenue Theatre HELLO, WE MUST BE CLOSING at Ruggles Cabaret It’s a jungle out there, all right. Wall Street, 1986, the high-stress world of stockbrokers: the men talk business and spectator sports, brag about their incomes and alma maters, complain about their wives and ex-wives, and drink, drink, drink. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

While watching a recent World War II documentary, I noticed the U.S. flag with 48 stars in a six-by-eight matrix. Of course now we have 50 stars, with alternating rows of five and six. This raises several questions. When we add a state, who makes the decision on how the stars will be arranged? Is […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bela Fleck & the Flecktones

Even if there were more of them, Bela Fleck would still be the world’s best jazz banjo player; the fact that he’s apparently alone in his field just makes him an innovator to boot. (The banjo, for a number of reasons, is especially unsuited to the expressive demands of jazz even though the instrument and […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

The stock market dropped 1,000 points this morning, after two young women dressed entirely in black were spotted on LaSalle Street pigging out on a Whitman’s Sampler. From Loyola University fine-arts professor Justine Mantor: “The general health of our economy is usually reflected in the popular colors of the time and if all we’re seeing […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Support Your Local Artists

To the editors: I get the feeling when I read [Lewis Lazare’s] column [The Culture Club] that you are writing the obituary of Chicago theatre in serialized installments. Is your job as a journalist simply to sling mud on the industry that provides your livelihood? In these times of censorship and extreme conservatism, the Arts […]

Posted inArts & Culture

His Majestie’s Clerkes

When the distinguished British choral conductor David Willcocks made his local debut with His Majestie’s Clerkes two seasons ago, he received standing ovations. Head of the Bach Choir of London and a celebrated organist, Willcocks combines musicianship and scholarship in his approach to prebaroque vocal music–as fans of his popular recordings with the King’s College […]

Posted inNews & Politics

In Defense of Clean Sweep

To the editors: Your decision to accept and publish Jane Juffer’s article “Clean Sweep’s Dirty Secret” [October 5] was poor judgement. The story is clearly biased and unfairly criticizes an effective program. For countless years the residents of CHA public housing, city officials, and the public have been unsuccessful in their attempts to improve the […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Larry Coryell

Larry Coryell has been one of music’s great enigmas since he first caught the public ear, in 1967, as part of the original Gary Burton Quartet. It wasn’t just a question of whether he was a rock guitarist or a jazzer–in truth, he was helping to redefine both terms–but also a matter of just where […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Garbage Journalism

To the editors: Last week’s “What a Waste!” by Harold Henderson was garbage masquerading as journalism [September 28]. First, Henderson blatantly attempts to discredit Illinois’ environmentalists and grassroots groups (disparagingly referred to as “environmentalists of the not-in-my-backyard persuasion”). It is the job of the journalist (or so I thought) to present issues in an unbiased […]