Posted inArts & Culture

The Belle of Amherst

THE BELLE OF AMHERST Body Politic Theatre Emily Dickinson has always presented problems for scholars. The egalitarian precepts of the romantic movement in literature introduced the thitherto-unknown (or long-forgotten) notion of a female poet, although they saddled this innovative creature with the potentially ridiculous characteristics of the genre–the egocentric hypersensitivity, the charismatic antirationalism, and the […]

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Uncommon Ground

UNCOMMON GROUND Northlight Theatre Jeremy Lawrence’s play about the political upheaval in the U.S. and Poland in 1968 opened as U.S. bombs rained on Iraq and Scud missiles hit Israel. During intermission, at least one couple was listening to the news on the radio, and some people in the audience actually brought Walkmans. Yet the […]

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Chicago Chamber Musicians

When Stravinsky wrote L’histoire du soldat (The Soldier’s Tale) in 1918, Europe was deeply mired in the Great War. Stranded in neutral Switzerland and despondent over reports of senseless brutalities from the front, the youthful (36-year-old) composer–with the help of Swiss writer C.F. Ramuz–came up with this morality play, a combination of music, dance, and […]

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Speeches and Dreams

CHICAGO PERFORMS Michael Zerang and Kaja Overstreet at Randolph Street Gallery January 25 and 26 Michael Zerang’s Hot Sands and Kaja Overstreet’s Moonlight are the two works making up this double bill, and they couldn’t be more oddly matched. Zerang’s piece uses broad, grotesque, cartoonish strokes to indict our country’s swaggering military posture in the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

While trying to figure out why our troops are in Saudi Arabia recently, I looked up the Kuwait-Saudi Arabia-Iraq area in my 1966 atlas. I found two large areas along the border called “neutral zones.” What does this term mean? Do Romulans live there? Do the zones have any relevance to the current conflict? –D. […]

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The City File

Fur-wearing vegetarian Tripti Shah Kasal writes that she has consulted “some of my friends who have the opposite contradiction–they believe in eating animals but not wearing them. I’ve only become more confused.ÉBut in the meantime, while we all figure this one out, I promise that when I walk into a restaurant and someone is eating […]

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Harry Kipper

“Yes, but which Harry Kipper?” one might well ask. Both of the Kipper Kids, whose bizarre conceptual comedy positioned them as sort of the Laurel and Hardy of the avant-garde in the 1970s and ’80s, used the name Harry. The team consisted of Martin von Haselberg (an Argentinean of German descent who subsequently married Bette […]

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Pressing Concerns

To the editors: [Re: Hot Type, January 18] How terrible, Gorbachev is again clamping the press in Russia. How shocking, the military restricts those brave correspondents in the combat zones. How lucky, that in Chicago we live with an independent and courageous press where the Tribune’s editor-in- chief, an erstwhile lawyer yet, stamps out–comic strips! […]

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The Sports Section

The day after the Bears lost to the New York Giants in the playoffs, the Bulls played host to the Milwaukee Bucks, the team they had just shouldered aside to seize first place in the division. It was the Bucks, and not the defending NBA champion Detroit Pistons, who led the Central Division for most […]

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Pogroms in Poland

To the editors: Ms. Eva Jastrzebski of the Polish American Congress comments in the September 24 issue [Letters] on “Children of the Holocaust” [July 6] and wonders why the writer and his interviewees were critical of the Polish people during the nazi occupation. Unfortunately, many Poles were too quick to help the nazis persecute Jews. […]