Posted inArts & Culture

Jim McNeely

With Jim McNeely, you have to listen a little harder than usual to catch the breadth of his playing–but once you do, he continues to impress you with his muscular technique and cinemascope conception. In fact, the more you hear him, the better he sounds. His solos seem to sprawl from one end of the […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Old Couple

THE SUNSHINE BOYS National Jewish Theater I never got to see real vaudeville. When I came of age, in the 60s, the old Regal was long gone, the Chicago Theatre defunct. The legendary Adelphi (our answer to New York’s Palace) had dwindled into the Clark, a film revival house torn down in the late 60s. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Our Atrocities

To the editors: A friend in Chicago recently sent me a copy of the article published May 10 in the Reader. “The Dying Has Just Begun” by Tom Johnson is singularly the finest piece I have read since the Gulf War. The media played a significant role by underreporting the devastation that our bombing caused […]

Posted inNews & Politics

News of the Weird

Lead Story In Hull, England, Judge Arthur Myerson ignited protest in March when he rejected a life sentence for rapist Brian David Huntley and gave him three years instead. Myerson said he gave the lesser sentence because Huntley “showed concern and consideration by wearing a contraceptive.” Grudges A February story in the Quad City Times […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Genocide Begins at Home

To the editors: The Reader should be commended for printing “The Dying Has Just Begun” in the May 10, 1991, issue. Tom Johnson’s interview with Louise Cainkar of the Human Rights Research Foundation about the consequences of the U.S. war against Iraq contained facts so horrible that it was almost physically painful to read. I […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Out of Austria

AUSTRIAN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN: BEYOND TRADITION IN THE 1990s at the Art Institute Israeli journalist Amos Elon recently filed a “Report From Vienna” in the New Yorker that claimed, among other things, that Austrian society still visibly yearns for its imperial past, which was dismantled three-quarters of a century ago. Elon’s extremely unflattering portrait of […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bitter Sweet

In 1929, already celebrated for his satirical revues and smart plays, Noel Coward offered his first operetta to London audiences. It was a resounding hit. Neither cynical nor particularly witty, Bitter Sweet harks back to the gentler, more decorous days of Strauss’s Vienna, to the irony-ridden, sophisticated milieu of Die Fledermaus. Its story line is […]

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Lobsterman

Lobsterman stands, as he is inclined to do, at Michigan and Pearson, tall, red, and proud. Hurrying shoppers ignore him as rain begins to fall, assailing his huge red head and shiny satin skin. For a few minutes he seems a mere shell of a man–stiffly awaiting recognition, even acknowledgment. He starts to wander east […]

Posted inArts & Culture

William Clarke

California’s William Clarke has become one of the most rapidly rising stars in the new generation of blues musicians. He perfected his shimmering, wide-chorded harp playing studying with the late Harmonica George Smith, and Smith’s distinctive eclecticism is evident everywhere in Clarke’s approach: on a straight-ahead shuffle he bends notes with the raucous abandon of […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Love Among the Lettuce

DAVID PUSZH DANCE COMPANY AND HEARSAY at the Weinstein Center for the Performing Arts June 21 and 22 Whether you believe musical theater is entirely moribund or the most vital and accessible performance form in America, your position is supported by The Ballad of Etta Blue, an original one-act musical by Cheri Coons and Eric […]