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Posted inArts & Culture

His Majestie’s Clerkes and the Orpheus Band

Heinrich Schutz (1585-1672) has never been a household name, even though he’s widely acknowledged by musicologists as the greatest German composer before Bach. Chief among his innovations were the introduction of Italian madrigal styles to northern countries and the use of German texts instead of Latin ones in liturgical music. Schutz almost didn’t become a […]

Posted inNews & Politics

You’re the Boss

To the editors: Thank you for creating a greater awareness of the intimidation and harassment by our own government towards civil rights activists like Jeanne Bishop [April 10]. Americans should be outraged that the U.S. government freely violates our Constitutional rights in order to serve the political agenda of foreign governments. There are many activists […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Victor in Wonderland

LIZARD MUSIC Lifeline Theatre There used to be a street entertainer, an old man, who worked Chicago’s neighborhoods with trained chickens. He seemed sort of a cross between Uncle Remus and Dr. Lao–bizarre, a little pathetic, yet also hilarious and magical. He wore baggy, beat-up old clothes and a floppy hat, and around his neck […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Milly’s Orchid Show

The opera world was shocked when Aristotle Onassis dumped Maria Callas for Jackie Kennedy–but not half as shocked as Callas herself might be to learn of her illegitimate daughter “Dagmar Onassis,” who’s existed for a decade now in the person of actor-dancer-singer John Kelly. Kelly, who blends Bizet and Bellini with Monteverdi and Mahler (not […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Double Feature

DOUBLE FEATURE Theatre M and Diamondback Theater at Stage Left Theatre One can draw many facile comparisons between Quincy Long’s The Johnstown Vindicator and David Mamet’s Squirrels, which are playing together at Stage Left under the heading “Double Feature.” Squirrels is a dissection of uninspired writing, while The Johnstown Vindicator is an example of it. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Locked Up in Time

A fascinating German documentary by Sybille Schonemann about her return to the East German penitentiary where she spent a year as a political prisoner before Germany’s reunification. In addition to restaging portions of her own arrest and incarceration, she films her confrontations with the officials who brought unspecified charges against her, the secret police who […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Jackie Mason: Brand New

The stage of the Shubert Theatre is laid out like a television news studio for Jackie Mason’s new one-man show–desks, chairs, elaborately schlocky “JM” logos on the walls, and big and little TV monitors everywhere. The stocky, shock-haired Mason comes on and, for a couple of hilarious hours, pointedly ignores these trappings; preferring instead to […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Dying to Talk

Recently in the Renaissance Room of the Hotel Inter-Continental, several hundred doctors and lawyers gathered to talk about putting patients to death. They also came to share secrets, confess, and grieve. The conference–Physician Assisted Dying: Progress or Peril?, sponsored by the American Society of Law & Medicine–was intended to help these doctors and lawyers evaluate […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Kind Ness

KIND NESS Blind Parrot Productions at the Gallery Ping Chong’s Kind Ness is a sly piece. It’s so harmonious, so funny, so darn entertaining that it’s easy to sit back and mindlessly watch it the way you’d watch a Cubs game from a good seat behind home plate. Then you start to think about what […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Glass Menagerie/The Last Meeting of the Knights of the White Magnolia

THE GLASS MENAGERIE Black Ensemble THE LAST MEETING OF THE KNIGHTS OF THE WHITE MAGNOLIA Avenue Productions at Avenue Theatre You can take it as a compliment to the universality of Tennessee Williams’s best-known work. In Black Ensemble’s African American version of The Glass Menagerie, Williams’s memory play about a troubled family that can only […]