Posted inArts & Culture

Buddy . . . the Buddy Holly Story

Rock-and-roll lore holds that in his first public performance, in a Texas talent show, five-year-old Buddy Holly sang “Down the River of Memories.” That’s exactly where this British musical based on Holly’s life and legend aims to take its audience, and thanks to a package of great Holly hits and a warm and commanding lead […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Together Alone

TOGETHER ALONE at Cafe Voltaire Together Alone, originally a low-budget black-and-white film by P.J. Castellaneta and David Dechant, won highest praise at gay and lesbian film festivals in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Toronto, and Berlin. It’s easy to see how one could fall in love with this script, in which a potentially disastrous one-night stand […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Joel Owes Me Dinner

JOEL OWES ME DINNER Spit & Tape Theatre Company at Angel Island D.H. Lawrence, in one of his more anti-Christian moments, once suggested England would be better off if no one read the Bible for a generation. That way the generation that followed could read it with fresh eyes. I’m beginning to feel the same […]

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Unlawful Entry

An efficient little thriller that imparts loads of queasiness and reasonable amounts of suspense while serving as an excellent corrective to the shameless celebrations of LA police power and brutality in Lethal Weapon 3. The LA cop in this case (effectively played by Ray Liotta) is a psycho who falls for an attractive yuppie housewife […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Past Times: the way we warred

The burgeoning interest in 1940s American culture has recently borne the TV series Homefront, which focuses on the postwar scene in a small Ohio city; last year’s “Art of the Forties” show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art; and Loyola University’s recent conference on “The War in American Culture.” Fiftieth-anniversary commemorations of World War […]

Posted inNews & Politics

A Couple of Idiots

To the editors: I was glad to see Jack Helbig address the important issue of the role of the audience at the performance of Krapp’s Last Tape, part of the International Theatre Festival of Chicago [June 26]. However, I must add to what he said by saying that it isn’t just a problem of the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

Several years ago an acquaintance gave me a very strange 2,097-page religious work called the Urantia Book. It was first printed in 1955 by the Urantia Foundation in Chicago and is supposed to have been “indited” (I had to look that one up) by “time-space overcontrollers of the grand universe,” with names like Mighty Messenger […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Limited Access

To the editors: This is in reference to an error which appeared in your June 12 Reader article, “Gays and Lesbians in Their Own Images.” One paragraph of the article read: “Scheduled to air on local cable television earlier this year, Wright’s video ran head-on into political problems at the Chicago Access channel offices. Because […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

“Political stickering is a fun, effective, and cheap way to promote messages,” advises the Madison, Wisconsin, newsletter Nukewatch Pathfinder (Fall 1991). “Stickers like these [This product causes cancer or this teaches killing] will stick to almost any surface and are small enough to carry in a pocket….The act of stickering is illegal as it defaces […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Get With It

To the editors: The Reader desperately needs to improve its music coverage. A recent loud reminder of this was Bill Wyman’s essay on Michael Jackson [February 7]. Good God. Michael Jackson?! No matter how awkwardly Wyman strains for profundity, the sad fact remains that his long-winded articles tend to analyze vapid music that’s probably of […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Cure

Dig through the fine print on the Cure’s new Wish and you’ll find this snatch of Shelley: “Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.” That about sums up the source of the band’s phenomenal growth: On new songs like “High,” “To Wish Impossible Things,” and “A Letter to Elise” leader Robert Smith […]

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Actors’ Equity

To the editors: I worry that a careless reader of Lewis Lazare’s excellent piece on Hauptmann’s travails in New York [Culture Club, June 26] might come to the erroneous conclusion that it was I who chafed about having to pay for a long week of rehearsals although not all of the allowable work hours were […]