Posted inArts & Culture

Visible Cities

In Babette Mangolte’s new film Visible Cities two women search for a house they can afford in southern California. We do not see the women on the screen; we only hear their voices on the sound track while we view images of the locales and houses they visit. The landscapes are terrifyingly well-ordered: The abrupt […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Yes, It Was Nono

To the editors: Regarding the letter by Ross Feller [August 21] concerning Ted Shen’s review of the May 15 Goethe-Institut concert. I was disturbed to not find a reply from Ted Shen and (or) Frank Abbinanti regarding the latter’s non-performance of Nono’s Post-Praeludium per Donau. The implications are appalling and enormous for anyone interested in […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

A friend recently told me that her boss, an Orthodox Jew, could not eat M&M’s due to their shells being coated with beetle juice. Restricting bug intake doesn’t seem extraordinary considering Talmudic law (which might be more discerning than federal food regulations but who knows), but what about the accusation that insects are being used […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Neighbor Against Neighbor

To the editors: Recently in the Reader July 17 issue I read an article concerning the conflict of the Sheffield Neighborhood Association and dog owners in the community [Neighborhood News]. This weekend July 18-19 was the SNA’s largest annual fund-raiser the Garden Walk. And frankly I’m fed up with the attitudes of the SNA. I […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

“Whenever the stresses of life build up to dangerous levels, I throw myself into birds, flowers and trees,” writes Stephen Packard on the 15th anniversary of the North Branch Prairie Project, in Prairie Projections (August). “Other people may choose fast cars, the Bible, drugs, or chocolate. Fine. But to me nature is the healer. It […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Garbage Cross

It’s a rainy summer night in Bucktown. Inside the neon-lighted entrance to the David Leonardis Gallery on Paulina a noisy packed house is looking at the latest paintings by Chris Peldo. Among the abstract, often subliminally sexual paintings is a crucifix outlined in oak and filled with an assortment of junk–peanuts, crushed Coca-Cola cans, Reese’s […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Terkel on McCarter

To the editors: Bryan Miller’s cover story on Bill McCarter, Channel 11’s general manager (September 4), quotes me accurately for the most part. She’s on the button concerning my disdain for WTTW’s Board of Trustees (CETA). However, I was astonished by this quote attributed to me: “The more I think of Bill McCarter, the less […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Around the Coyote

Taking its name from the Tower Building at the intersection of North, Damon, and Milwaukee–commonly called the “Coyote Building” because it once housed the Coyote Gallery–this multimedia arts event includes a sizable theater and performance component (coordinated this year by Wm. Bullion, director of Sliced Bread Productions) that lays claim to being Chicago’s only entirely […]

Posted inArts & Culture

All American

LOS ENCUENTROS at the Betty Rymer Gallery of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Since the earliest days of its life as an industrial center Chicago has pulled people from abroad, first from Europe and the Baltic states, then from Asia, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. People of widely diverse […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Thomas Hampson has a sexy baritone that can sound rakishly charming (singing the role of Don Giovanni) or touchingly heroic (as Apollo). Porbably the most strikingly talented American male singer to have emerged since Sherrill Milnes, the Indiana native pairs up with soprano Edit Wiens to sing Brahms’s German Requiem in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Del Amitri/Gin Blossoms

The friendly and melodic Scottish foursome Del Amitri traffic in a throwbacky, uncomplicated pop rock from an earlier time; the slight lilt in singer Justin Currie’s voice and the sometimes jaunty instrumentation remind me strongly of the Sanford/Townsend Band’s “Smoke From a Distant Fire.” Currie’s songs are always serviceable, and sometimes–like on a lot of […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Mirror on the Moon

A former archaeologist and forger of relics (Barton Fink’s David Warrilow), awaiting the arrival of a former colleague (film critic Berenice Reynaud), revises the story he plans to tell her about the disappearance of a Mayan hieroglyphic tablet from an excavation in the Yucatan many years before. Writer-director Leandro Katz, an Argentinean now based in […]