Posted inArts & Culture

Andrew Calhoun

If you’re not ordinarily seduced by the sometimes prim aesthetics of the folk music world, you should still know about Andrew Calhoun, one folkie who can really sing about life without mucking it up with pallid nostalgia or cloying harmonies. Calhoun’s roots in the Anglo-Irish folk tradition run as deep as any other folksinger’s, but […]

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Yuppies’ Comeuppance

TINY DIMES Famous Door Theatre Company at Jane Addams Center Hull House America doesn’t know it, but it’s been waiting since around 1984 for a play like Tiny Dimes. Ever since words like junk bond, megamerger, and corporate raider started falling out of people’s mouths, ever since yuppies started gabbing on car phones in their […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Margie Gillis

MARGIE GILLIS at the Dance Center of Columbia College, April 23 and 24 Margie Gillis is gorgeous. She has hair like a long lick of flame and a bone structure as fine and compelling as a Rembrandt. Her responsive body and face easily record the passage of music and emotion. And she’s smart–she knows what […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Where the News Is

To the editors: Re: Michael Miner’s Hot Type on Raymond Bonner, removed from reporting on El Salvador by the New York Times [April 16] Michael Miner is right to focus on the efforts by the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal to suppress Raymond Bonner’s report of a massacre and other human-rights violations […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Symphony in X

SYMPHONY IN X X-temporaneous Productions at Center Theater Studio In an explanatory program note playwright Maggie Berg says that her new play, Symphony in X, is the product of anger and confusion. She speaks of her generation, which Douglas Coupland dubbed “Generation X,” as a group somehow left disenfranchised but not without hope. She says […]

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The Balcony

Subtlety has never been the New Criminals’ strong suit. Known for their rowdy version of commedia dell’arte, New Crime Productions usually fails for the same reasons they succeed. Methusalem was loud and energetic–and soared; Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was loud and energetic–and flopped. Then along came David Sinaiko. Taking the company’s kick-ass acting […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Father & Son

Here we are in a little grove, looking out on a river where Pere Marquette and his Indian guides once paddled in birchbark canoes, and here is a boy who ought to be in school but seems instead to be living in the back of a van learning about life from his

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

Why are there push buttons at intersections that say “push me and traffic will stop so you can cross quicker,” or something like that? It doesn’t work! I wouldn’t say I’m neurotic about it, but about 15 years ago I quit my job to hitchhike around the USA to find a push-to-walk traffic signal that […]

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McCoy Tyner Big Band

It shouldn’t surprise anyone when a jazz pianist organizes a big band. If you picture the piano as a “miniature orchestra”–a common characterization that dates back to the instrument’s invention–you can easily appreciate the lure of translating a pianist’s impromptu arrangements to the larger medium. But at first blush, that wouldn’t seem to work far […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

Illinois’ four PAC-millionaire U.S. representatives–those who have received more than $1 million in the last decade from “special-interest political action committees,” according to Common Cause: Robert Michel (R-Peoria), $2.5 million; Dan Rostenkowski (D-Chicago), $2.2 million; Richard Durbin (D-Springfield), $1.3 million; and Lane Evans (D-Quad Cities), $1.3 million. Only conservative north-suburban Philip Crane (R) got nothing […]