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Posted inArts & Culture

1994 International Theatre Festival of Chicago

The fest finishes off this weekend with performances by the Netherlands’ Dogtroep and Ireland’s Gate Theatre; also on the agenda are breakfast and lunch presentations, postshow discussions, and professional workshops. Performances take place at DePaul University’s Merle Reskin Theatre, 60 E. Balbo, and the Navy Pier Skyline Stage, 600 E. Grand (at Lake Michigan); other […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Living; Breaking the Code

THE LIVING Interplay BREAKING THE CODE Interplay Artists have always helped us see our world anew; we need such vision now more than ever. Fortunately some of our most perceptive and ingenious social critics–Douglas Crimp, Paula Treichler, and Simon Watney, to name but a few–continue to reframe the AIDS crisis, reimagining our contemporary world partly […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

Why were the Russians always able to land their cosmonauts on land while we had to land our astronauts on water? –Jim Blewer, Alameda, California What’s so great about coming down on land? It’s just that hard landings were better suited to a country with lots of territory, not much money or hospitable ocean access, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Sisters in the House

LOVVE/RITUALS AND RAGE Root Wy’mn Theater Company at Randolph Street Gallery, May 27 and 28 The great contradiction of performance art is that though it has habitually posed as radical and political, as ironic commentary on the academy, it is in fact very much a part of the institution it supposedly critiques. Even the issues […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

“The likelihood is that we’re going to get an information railroad and not an information highway,” Abdul Alkalimat told his audience at the Harold Washington Library last March (Video, May/June). The government, he pointed out, gave railroads public land for free, then let them charge riders and freight shippers. “At a latter stage, based on […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Artist to Birds: eat my suit

Sculptor Mark Bello doesn’t have a Christ complex or Saint Francis fantasy, but he’s inviting a bunch of birds to a lakeside brunch–on him. He’ll be wearing a cosmopolitan suit of bread featuring baguettes, chappathi, matzo, pita, and Wonder. Bello titles his one-man bird-feeding act Beneath the Bread, part of Randolph Street Gallery’s Off Site […]

Posted inArts & Culture

On Exhibit: the map as metaphor

Maps are intrinsically appealing because they can be both utilitarian devices and objects of painstaking, beautiful detail. But “Art on the Map,” on view at the Chicago Cultural Center, isn’t merely about the distinguished history and craftsmanship of mapmaking. It’s an examination of the map as metaphor: for travel, for political, philosophical, and metaphysical boundaries, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

At the Boundary of Art and Life

BLINKY PALERMO, BRUCE NAUMAN, AND RUDOLF SCHWARZKOGLER at the Arts Club of Chicago, through June 30 The visitor to the exhibit of works by Blinky Palermo, Bruce Nauman, and Rudolf Schwarzkogler at the Arts Club of Chicago will likely be struck by how different each artist seems from the others. What could Rudolf Schwarzkogler’s photographs […]

Posted inMusic

Crude Marx…but You Can Dance to It

MARXMAN 33 REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE (A&M) Unpublished excerpt from a letter by Friedrich Engels to novelist Margaret Harkness: Dear Miss Harkness, It has come to my attention that a certain Marxman is now invoking the ideas of our good friend and comrade Karl Marx. Indeed, both Marx and I were astonished to find ourselves credited […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Grant Park Symphony Orchestra

After almost two decades of self-imposed semiretirement, pianist Van Cliburn is making a comeback. And the Grant Park Music Festival nabbed him for its 60th season opener to the tune of a reported $50,000. Never mind that Cliburn has never lived up to the early promise he showed following Moscow’s 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition. As the […]

Posted inMusic

A Genre of One

MAYO THOMPSON CORKY’S DEBT TO HIS FATHER (DRAG CITY) Let’s take the story of popular music to be like a drive down Main Street. Branching off from the central thoroughfare of music history are occasional culs-de-sac, blind alleys occupied by influential individual musicians, groups, and sometimes single records. One can’t exactly explain why or how […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Guys and Dolls

GUYS AND DOLLS Shubert Theatre Director Jerry Zaks has done to Guys and Dolls what Warren Beatty did to “Dick Tracy” in his movie version: taken material that already puts a fantasy spin on reality and removed it one step further. Zaks and set designer Tony Walton, whose bright pop-art backdrops dominate the show, have […]