Posted inArts & Culture

Charles Gayle Trio

When New York’s power-blowing reedman Charles Gayle came to town last year, he teamed up with the ad hoc rhythm section of bassist Harrison Bankhead and percussionist Paul Wertico, and the results were unfortunate: the former lacked Gayle’s energy while the latter overplayed. Supporting Gayle this year are drummer Michael Wimberly and bassist Michael Bisio. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

My Mother Said I Never Should

MY MOTHER SAID I NEVER SHOULD, Center Theater Ensemble. Now that it has expanded its acting component and added various directors, designers, and playwrights to the company, Center Theater is changing its name, to Center Theater Ensemble. That emphasis on collaboration is well illustrated in the current production, Charlotte Keatley’s My Mother Said I Never […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bent

BENT, European Repertory Company. In his introduction to the forthcoming new edition of Heinz Heger’s The Men With the Pink Triangle, historian Klaus Muller points out that “a mere quarter of adults in the United States know that gays were victims of the Nazi Holocaust.” So any time a production of Bent reaches a new […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Voices of Enterprise

I cringed when the usually thoughtful Michael Miner described one of my former meal tickets, the soon-to-be-folded Chicago Enterprise, as “the voice of the Civic Committee of the Commercial Club of Chicago” (Hot Type, August 26). Not quite, Mike. Chicago Enterprise was funded by the Civic Committee, but no one who read it carefully could […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Milk outrage: bovine growth hormone becomes an issue in the schools

It would seem that the problems confronting Chicago’s public school system couldn’t get any worse. Well, now comes a complaint that the system is endangering the health of thousands of children by serving them milk from cows injected with a potentially dangerous synthetic hormone. The accusation is wildly inaccurate, some dairy and chemical-industry officials contend. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

Why does metal catch on fire in the microwave? –Maura McCormick, Rockville, Maryland Can’t say I’ve come across any cases of metal actually catching on fire in a microwave, though my experiments in this respect haven’t been as extensive as I’d like, owing to Mrs. Adams’s refusal to sacrifice (potentially) the household microwave to the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Sins of Omission

“The Panic in Wicker Park” (August 26) was startling in its omissions. The article focused on artists being victimized by gentrification. But most of the people driven westward out of their West Town homes have been Puerto Rican, Mexican, African American, and in far fewer numbers, Appalachian and ethnic white. White artists as victims of […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The City File

No thanks, I’m not hungry anymore. Recent publicity for a cooking magazine: “Making pie crust that isn’t soggy, hard, flavorless, under-salted, under-baked, or totally unworkable can be a home cook’s worst nightmare.” “Since 1980, spending by the [Illinois] legislative branch has nearly doubled from $40 million to $75 million,” report Karen Nagel and Max Ragozzo […]

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Barrett Deems Big Band

Without sacrificing quality, you could put together a pretty good band of jazz octogenarians; saxist Benny Carter, violinist Stephane Grappelli, trumpeter Doc Cheatham, and bassist Milt Hinton come immediately to mind. But even in this company drummer Barrett Deems–old as dirt (and just as gritty)–would stand out. No instrument places a greater physical demand on […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Stand By Your Woman

In response to T. Miller’s August 5th letter in which he or she assails cartoonist Heather McAdams for failing to include the Paul Bunyan restaurant in her gallantly jam-packed two page double-truck travel issue cartoon entitled “Hester Duzz Da Dells” [July 1], I’d like to say: If T. Miller spent more time on his or […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Paper Flowers

PAPER FLOWERS, Eliand Productions, at Cafe Voltaire. Given a few more weeks of rehearsal, Eliand Productions’ Paper Flowers could be challenging, could be layered with intriguing social and political undertones. As it is, Egon Wolff’s two-character drama about the immutability of class conflict and the emotional struggles of artists is far too tentative and uneasy. […]