Posted inArts & Culture

Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra

ILLINOIS PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA The title of Lita Grier’s Renascence for flute and orchestra holds a double meaning: the ten-minute concertino not only was adapted from a sonata composed three decades ago but also signals the rebirth of Grier’s composing career, dormant since the mid-60s. At 16 Grier won a New York Philharmonic young composers’ contest. […]

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The Angel’s House

Scandalously neglected and all but forgotten in recent years, Leopoldo Torre-Nilsson (1924-1978), perhaps the first world-class Argentinean director, enjoyed a certain vogue in this country in the early 60s–despite the stiff competition from France, Italy, and Japan in offering personal and stylistically expressive cinema. Among his films distributed in that era, La casa del angel […]

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Chicago Latino Film Festival

The 12th annual edition of the Chicago Latino Film Festival, produced by Chicago Latino Cinema and Columbia College, runs from Friday, April 12, through Monday, April 22. Film and video screenings will be at the Village, 1548 N. Clark; at Facets Multimedia Center, 1517 W. Fullerton; at Northeastern Illinois Univ. Heritage Room, 55OO N. Saint […]

Posted inMusic

A Band in All Hope

A BAND IN ALL HOPE Cute name, though hard to figure: “Abandon All Hope” emblazoned Dante’s entrance to hell, but there’s nothing satanic about this trio, and the music has too much order and logic to remotely suggest Pandemonium. In fact, you won’t even find much in the way of darkness in this group, because […]

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La Compagnie Philippe Genty

Philippe Genty’s shows, which so deftly combine puppetry and dance, have always been filled with dreamlike imagery–billowing sheets, waltzing performers who suddenly shrink down to nothing, tiny armies of office workers in identical suits and bowlers. But Genty’s latest work, Voyageur immobile (“Motionless Voyager”), is not merely dreamlike–it is a dream, plucked from Genty’s head […]

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Sea of Fire

Sea of Fire, Lifeline Theatre. How is it that some performers, like Spalding Gray, can stand onstage and rattle on and on about themselves, making clear with every sentence that their one true love is themselves–and we hang on every word? While others deliver similarly self-absorbed shows and inspire only yawns and glassy stares? Kevin […]

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Little Milton

LITTLE MILTON Little Milton is one of the few active bluesmen who can trace their careers back to Sam Phillips’s legendary Sun label in Memphis. In those days Milton mimicked everyone from his Memphis compatriot B.B. King to New Orleans shouter Roy Brown with uncanny accuracy, and though his sides from that era are now […]

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Illustrious Bloodspill

Illustrious Bloodspill, Curious Theatre Branch, at Live Bait Theater. Who says theater is too slow and cerebral for fans of action films? Bryn Magnus’s satirical homage to Hollywood violence begins with a chase–with all chases, in fact: the lone fugitive pursued by a mob, the speeding car smashing through the glass sheet inevitably being carried […]

Posted inMusic

A Cloud Over Clubland

The situation the owners of Lounge Ax have found themselves in is an example of the repercussions the city’s strict liquor laws can have on valuable and law-abiding institutions. The situation seems intractable. Since there’s little money to be made in rock ‘n’ roll, the live-music industry–on the club level at least–has become a subset […]

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Restaurant Tours: old spaces, new faces

There are dozens of theories about what makes for successful restaurant spaces, and each occasionally has been proved wrong. No-nos include windowless places high off the ground or below ground level. Yet for decades Le Perroquet, eight stories above Walton Street, and Maxim’s, one story under Astor, were roaring successes. On the other hand several […]