Posted inMusic

Randy Sabien

RANDY SABIEN Why does it always take so long for Randy Sabien–who lives about eight hours up the pike, in northern Wisconsin, fercrissake–to return to Chicago? (This weekend marks his second or third visit this decade; even so, he remains worth the wait.) When he first came on the scene, in the early 80s, Sabien […]

Posted inArts & Culture

A Delicate Operation

Walking the Dead Theatre Q at the Halsted St. Cafe By Justin Hayford Film historian Thomas Waugh contends that “melodrama has…a privileged relationship with gay men, situated as we are, like women, if not outside patriarchal power, in ambiguous and contradictory relationship to it.” For Waugh, “that much-stigmatized genre” stands opposed to “the male genres […]

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Tokyo String Quartet

Tokyo String Quartet For a long time the Tokyo String Quartet, with their crisp, brittle playing and fierce intellectualism, sounded like the Juilliard Quartet. In fact violist Kazuhide Isomura and cellist Sadao Harada studied at Juilliard under the Juilliard Quartet’s founder, Robert Mann. But these days, almost three decades after their debut, the Tokyo String […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Mistaken Identity

Dear Mr. Hayford, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for attending and reviewing Gigantic Productions’ premiere of Charlie’s Good Time Gospel Hour [June 14]. However, I feel it is important to point out that it was Michael Dowd, not myself, who performed the part of Charlie (as stated in your review). […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Demonstration Of Power

By Bill Boisvert I’d planned to spend Saturday at Taste of Chicago, but when I leave the subway someone thrusts a leaflet into my hands warning that the Ku Klux Klan will appear in force at Daley Plaza that afternoon. By three o’clock the plaza has come to life with a crowd of perhaps 50 […]

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Bailiwick Repertory’s Directors Festival ’96

Bailiwick Repertory’s Directors Festival ’96 The eighth annual edition of this showcase of directorial talent features work by generally unknown pros, semipros, and students; selections range in content from established classical and contemporary selections to untested material. Bailiwick Repertory, Bailiwick Arts Center, 1229 W. Belmont, 883-1090. Opens Monday, July 15, 7:30 PM. Through August 14: […]

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Raw Vision

Jim Waid at Jean Albano Gallery, through July 20 Mose Tolliver: Early Works at Intuit, through September 14 By Fred Camper Sometimes art that results from years of training and dedicated searching can seem less vital than pictures dashed off by an untrained painter. Two current shows of paintings by two artists reveal different approaches […]

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Chanticleer

Chanticleer Chanticleer’s cool vocalizing is the perfect antidote to summertime blahs. This a cappella ensemble from the Bay Area not only sings with precision and flexibility but delivers with panache. For this Grant Park Festival concert–only eight months after the group’s Orchestra Hall debut–the versatile 12-member Chanticleer (named after the Chaucerian rooster) has compiled a […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Critical Independence

Dear sir or madam: Art, it is true, is transcendent, but it can’t reach the masses unless someone with genuine passion and foresight champions it. That particular someone is a critic. And Chicagoans are very fortunate to have a particular critic, Jonathan Rosenbaum, who demands that his specific art form, film, be taken seriously (“Acid […]

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Bardo Pond

BARDO POND Psychedelic rock, like most rock-crit pigeonholes, has become an utterly meaningless term that’s applied indiscriminately to whimsical pop, meandering jams, and trippy electronic dance music. Bardo Pond take psychedelia back to its roots; two of the Philadelphia-based quintet’s albums, Amanita and Bufo Alvarius, are named after hallucinogenic substances (mushrooms and toads respectively). The […]

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News of the Weird

Lead Stories Middle East obsessions: According to a new book by Judith Miller, God Has Ninety-Nine Names, Moammar Gadhafi seriously pined for Bush administration State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler. And London’s Sunday Telegraph reported in December that Syria’s defense minister, Lieutenant General Mustafa Tlass, bombards Princess Diana with love letters. His library is said to […]

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Damaged Characters

Ass Ponys Double Door, June 21 David Lynch looks at small towns and sees their dark side. Chuck Cleaver looks at the dark side of small towns and sees their humanity. Ass Ponys front man Cleaver, who grew up in Clarksville, Ohio (population 300), and now resides in the 2,500-person town of Bethel, is a […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Comp Crisis

I could hardly believe my eyes when I saw that someone wrote a letter to the Reader chastising a critic for noticing the “friend-to-stranger” ratio, and then saying it doesn’t matter if the house is full of friends with comps, it is still an audience, let’s get over it. Ughghghghghghghghghghghghg! Whaaaaaaaat! Tip number one–if you […]

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The City File

By Harold Henderson A press release we didn’t want to finish: “Men With Prostate Disease Able to ‘Nuke’ the Problem.” After the NBA play-offs “another bit of tradition comes to Chicago,” writes Joel Alfassa in StreetWise (June 1-15). “The running of the homeless begins in earnest with a succession of events that begins in June […]