Posted inFilm

Too Big to Ignore

My Giant Rating *** A must see Directed by Michael Lehmann Written by David Seltzer With Billy Crystal and Gheorghe Muresan. Gummo Rating **** Masterpiece Directed and written by Harmony Korine With Jacob Reynolds and Nick Sutton. By Lisa Alspector I’ll be surprised if many people have anything negative to say about My Giant, a […]

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Chicago Symphony Orchestra

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA This week and next, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra is drawing a historical parallel–something it rarely does–by presenting the local premiere of Arvo Part’s Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten alongside Britten’s own tribute to an older master, Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge. In a way, these two works chart the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

CECIL: HEAD IN THE CLOUDS? In your column on the weight of a cloud versus that of a 747 [March 13], you state: “Now of course, it’s true that weight isn’t the same as mass, and that a cloud put on a scale wouldn’t weigh anything.” Yuck! The weight of an object equals its mass […]

Posted inFilm

The Newton Boys

The Newton Boys Not to be hyperbolic, but Richard Linklater’s first big-budget movie may be the Jules and Jim of bank-robber movies, thanks to its astonishing handling of period detail and its gentleness of spirit, both buoyed by a gliding lightness of touch. Linklater, Clark Lee Walker, and Claude Stanush (who also worked on the […]

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Tricks of Memory

Dark City Rating * Has redeeming facet Directed by Alex Proyas Written by Proyas, Lem Dobbs, and David S. Goyer With Rufus Sewell, Kiefer Sutherland, Jennifer Connelly, Richard O’Brien, Ian Richardson, and William Hurt. By Bill Boisvert People complain that movies are shallow, but I think they’ve become too highbrow. Take German expressionism, the cinematic […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Days of the Week

Friday 4/10 – Thursday 4/16 APRIL by Mike Sula 10 FRIDAY Ray Bradbury has been reworking his classic sci-fi novel Fahrenheit 451 in one form or another since its publication in 1953. In the 80s he created a stage adaptation of the work, which is about a dystopian future in which all books are systematically […]

Posted inMusic

Joseph Bowie’s Defunkt

JOSEPH BOWIE’S DEFUNKT In the late 70s, fusion was embraced by certain denizens of free jazz, most prominently James “Blood” Ulmer, Ornette Coleman’s Prime Time, Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society, and Joseph Bowie’s Defunkt. Trombonist Bowie–younger brother of Art Ensemble of Chicago trumpeter Lester–started out as a 17-year-old prodigy in Saint Louis’s Black Artists Group, […]

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Fahrenheit 451

FAHRENHEIT 451, Bailiwick Repertory. Written and published in the early days of the McCarthy era, Ray Bradbury’s dystopic 1953 novel is a sharp, angry, elegantly written screed against the media-inspired stupefaction of our culture and the fascist preference for strict order and conformity over the preservation of civil rights. Fahrenheit 451 the musical–cobbled together some […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Garth Fagan Dance

Garth Fagan Dance Somehow Garth Fagan’s dancers look glassy and fragile despite their obvious tensile strength. Maybe because he often tortures the body into unnatural lines, I fear that his dancers’ legs might snap in two or their torsos be irreversibly twisted. And though Fagan’s unusual style is often accounted for by his diverse background–from […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Correction

bommer.qxd Due to an editing error in my review of Jerker at Bailiwick Repertory [March 27], the character of Bert was misidentified. Steve Leonetti plays the historian crippled in Vietnam, Darren Stephens the willing recipient of his carnal courtship calls. Lawrence Bommer