Posted inFilm

Gipsy Magic

Gipsy Magic This 1997 Macedonian film about a Gypsy family in the war-torn Balkans draws most of its power from a narrative that shifts abruptly from bloody fighting to black comedy, mimicking a culture defined by turmoil. The family patriarch, caught in a blood feud with another family, comes up with a unique moneymaking scheme: […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Dance COLEctive

Dance COLEctive Sometimes self-imposed limits actually enhance creativity, as when a poet restricts herself to a certain rhyme scheme and meter. Margi Cole, artistic director of the Dance COLEctive, set herself a spatial goal in her new duet, Between Red Velvet Ropes: originally she hoped to present it in a hallway of the historic Glessner […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Pop

Pop Joel Meyerowitz directed this heartfelt valentine to his 87-year-old father, Hy, who suffers from Alzheimer’s. The director’s son serves as cameraman, and the two of them take the old man on a road trip from his south Florida retirement community to the Bronx, where he was born and later raised his family. Though frail […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

Your piece about the blue Fugates [July 24] was fascinating, but I don’t think Lonijo’s husband was talking about them when he referred to the “blue people” he studied in anthropology. The blue men are the Tuareg, a nomadic group of people in the Sahara whose traditional territories included Mali and parts of Niger, Morocco, […]

Posted inMusic

Reginald Robinson/ Jon Weber

REGINALD ROBINSON/JON WEBER Ragtime and stride don’t require more technique than later jazz-piano disciplines: they just sound that way, largely because they ask the pianist to mimic an entire band. (“Ragtime” refers to both the compositional form created by Scott Joplin in the late 19th century and the gently syncopated style in which he wrote; […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Days of the Week

Friday 9/25 – Thursday 10/1 SEPTEMBER By Cara Jepsen 25 FRIDAY It’s been said that the double take is the most appropriate response to surrealist art. And before their innovations were co-opted by perfume commercials, artists like Rene Magritte and Salvador Dali created arresting and controversial images by taking their cues from dreams and the […]

Posted inMusic

Julliard Quartet

JUILLIARD QUARTET My favorite recording by the Juilliard Quartet, out of the zillions it’s made during its 50-year career, is one featuring the sole string quartet by Verdi and the quartet in D minor by Sibelius–that is to say, works by two composers with absolutely zero reputation for chamber music. To me, that’s the real […]

Posted inMusic

No Mean Trick

Reputation Is a Fragile Thing: The Story of Cheap Trick by Mike Hayes with Ken Sharp (Poptastic!) By Frank Youngwerth Cheap Trick, you might have noticed, is in the midst of a rather unusual revival. Earlier this year Sony’s archival label Legacy issued At Budokan: The Complete Concert, and on Tuesday it will release “expanded […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Field & Street

September is the kindest month. A month when electric bills are going down and gas bills have not yet begun to go up. A month when mosquitoes are dying off but butterflies are still with us. A time when migrant songbirds enliven every backyard and parkway and the last flowers of summer are in full […]

Posted inMusic

Kenny Neal

KENNY NEAL Kenny Neal’s style has a taproot in the sparse, deeply emotional “swamp blues” of his native southern Louisiana: Baton Rouge legend Slim Harpo gave him his first harmonica, and Harpo’s guitarist Rudolph Richard was an early fretboard influence. But these days Neal mostly grafts that sound to funk, blues rock, and occasional down-home […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Playing Ketchup

Mike Royko, October 15, 1990: When they came in, you could see that demented minds were taking complete control and that Nodeggamra was starting. And putting ketchup on hot dogs was a real ominous symptom. Royko, July 17, 1991: And I promise to never again make snide remarks about sauerkraut on hot dogs. Or even […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Scientific Romances: H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds & The Invisible Man

Scientific Romances: H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds & The Invisible Man, Next Theatre Company. Give credit to adapters Steve Pickering and Charley Sherman for recognizing that turn-of-the-century visionary H.G. Wells is still significant in the digital age. His seminal treatises on the dangers of rapid, unchecked advances in science and industry are reference […]