Posted inNews & Politics

The Grievous Duck Tragedy

The poignant saga delving into the grievous tragedy of dead ducks in Lincoln Park [July 23] was actually encouraging. Amidst the throes and controversy emerged unanimous concern for the graceful creatures. If more people rightfully focused on animal-welfare issues, a momentous coalition could be motivated to implore legislators to recognize the importance of these ordeals. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bailiwick Repertory Directors’ Festival

Bailiwick Repertory Directors’ Festival Bailiwick Repertory’s 11th annual showcase of projects by emerging directors features programs of one-acts, ranging from one to three per evening, that run the gamut from established classical and contemporary selections to avant-garde rarities and untested original material. The fest runs August 2 through 25 at Bailiwick Repertory, Bailiwick Arts Center, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Kevin Welch

KEVIN WELCH Kevin Welch’s first 15 years in Nashville went pretty smoothly. Artists like Waylon Jennings, Trisha Yearwood, Ricky Skaggs, and Roger Miller recorded the native Okie’s songs, and by the early 90s he’d embarked on a solo career, releasing two albums of intelligent folk- and rock-tinged country (dubbed western beat for its literary qualities) […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Resurrecting the Living?

Dear editor: Someone–perhaps Zenny Sadlon and Mike Joyce–was pulling Zak Mucha’s leg (July 16). Jaroslav Hasek’s The Good Soldier Svejk is about as much in need of rescuing from oblivion as Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Hasek was one of only 17 writers (including Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, and Knut Hamsun) who were recommended in the “German, […]

Posted inNews & Politics

City File

The right- wing case for campaign finance reform. “State legislators loaded up on pork this session like starving men at a sausage factory,” writes W. Kent Fung in “Taxnews” (Summer), newsletter of National Taxpayers United of Illinois. Despite protests from NTU and other tax-cut advocates, “The politicians chose to listen to their heavy contributors–the connected […]

Posted inArts & Culture

All the World’s a Stage

All the World’s a Stage, Midnight Circus, at the Ivanhoe Theater. The show must go on, even after a simple magic trick accidentally conjures up none other than William Shakespeare himself. Fortunately the Bard’s immortal words turn out to complement the Midnight Circus’s dazzling physical pyrotechnics as well as the words of modern American playwrights […]

Posted inNews & Politics

How to Serve the Public

[Re: “Their Own Worst Enemies?,” June 25] A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Childish Political Activists in Chicago, Illinois, From Being a Burden on Their Community or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public. Recently it has been brought to my attention, through various and sundry illicit and explicit communications, that turmoil and […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Straight Dope

Did Jesus Christ have brothers and sisters? My friend Kathy and her husband Roy swear they heard that he did during a reading at a Catholic Mass. I find it hard to believe because it seems that it would fly in the face of Mary as the virgin mother, etc. I also find it hard […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Apples in Stereo/Beulah

APPLES IN STEREO/BEULAH Even an elephant might have trouble recalling all the records to come out this year under the auspices of the Elephant 6 Recording Company. The name refers to a clique of home-recording geeks that originated a decade ago in the college town of Ruston, Louisiana; its alumni, working in bands like Neutral […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Extremist Kooks?

To the editor– Mike Miner’s piece on the media’s role as tacit dupes of the World Church of the Creator [July 23] was interesting and revealing–but I believe Miner, like virtually all other “mainstream” critics and commentators, has missed the most significant element of how the U.S. media have chosen to approach this story. Virtually […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Calendar

Friday 7/30 – Thursday 8/5 JULY By Cara Jepsen 30 FRIDAY The centerpiece of Jennifer Baichwal’s 1998 film Let It Come Down: The Life of Paul Bowles is a rare interview with the writer and composer, who has spent most of his adult life in Morocco. In addition to chatting with contemporaries like William S. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Arling & Cameron

ARLING & CAMERON At the end of “Here We Go!”–one of many kitschy dance-pop ditties on All-In (Emperor Norton), the U.S. debut album by the Dutch duo Arling & Cameron–either Gerry Arling or Richard Cameron praises the amateurish Japanese singers Tomoko and Chika for their performance of the tune: “You’re really good, you’re really talented. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Life Before Def

Life Before Def, Black Ensemble Theater. Perhaps the strongest aspect of Victor Cole’s revue-style history of African-American comedy is its evenhandedness–even when he moves into sticky territory with the minstrel tradition. Rather than simply denouncing it, Cole reveals how black comedians of that era labored within a preexisting framework to counter the destructive impact of […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Home Invasion

When I moved to Lincoln Square, one of the first things I noticed was how clean the bums were. This was due mainly to the efforts of the laundromat at the corner of Wilson and Lincoln, which offered free soap on Mondays and Tuesdays. All a bum had to do was score a little spare […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Chelm!

Chelm!, Opera Factory, at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts in Skokie. Performing a one-person musical requires a wide array of exceptional skills. Ian Geller has one: a rich, booming, mellifluous baritone with the power to make a believer out of even the least devout person in shul. But Geller’s musical–his version of […]