Posted inArts & Culture

Real and Imagined

Imagination to Image at the Museum of Science and Industry, through September 12 American Pictorialism: From Stieglitz to Today at Catherine Edelman, through September 3 American Modernism: From Stieglitz to Today at Carol Ehlers, through September 3 By Fred Camper Debates about whether or not photography is a real art might seem anachronistic in the […]

Posted inMusic

Don’t Try This at Home

Music Tapes 1st Imaginary Symphony for Nomad (Merge) By J.R. Jones When I was a teenager, my friends and I worshiped Cream–or as they arrogantly liked to call themselves, the Cream, meaning the royalty of England’s blues-rock musicians. We were all learning to play instruments back then, and we honed our chops on endless, shapeless […]

Posted inMusic

Spot Check

PALADINS 8/6, Double Door This San Diego trio–the only band in the history of the world to record for both Alligator and 4AD–plays roots music with a capital R. On their sixth and latest album, Slippin’ In (Ruf), the Paladins stray further from their blues-rock beginnings to dig deeper into echo-chamber rockabilly and hillbilly thumpers, […]

Posted inFilm

Studies in Weightlessness

The Thomas Crown Affair Rating ** Worth seeing Directed by John McTiernan Written by Alan R. Trustman, Leslie Dixon, and Kurt Wimmer With Pierce Brosnan, Rene Russo, Denis Leary, Frankie R. Faison, and Faye Dunaway. By Jonathan Rosenbaum Seeing an original movie and its remake in reverse order is a bit like reading a novel […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Ira Sullivan

IRA SULLIVAN Burly, sometimes goateed, and partial to vintage plaid shirts, multi-instrumentalist Ira Sullivan looks like Kerouac’s picture of a rough-and-ready hipster. And his music, which he developed in Chicago in the hard-bopping 50s, still brims with the freewheeling expressiveness that the beat writers sought to emulate in their own rhythms and imagery. Twenty years […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Kahil El’Zabar

Kahil El’Zabar has an enduring allegiance to the spoken word, which is not always the case among musicians. The percussionist and bandleader is a published poet and struggled to create a performance space a few years ago, the First Amendment Cafe, for music and verse. As curator of Steppenwolf’s interdisciplinary “Traffic” series, he’s thrown together […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Tichborne Claimant

This elegantly mounted 1998 film is a delightful, gently comic tweaking of the British class system. Based on a true case from the 1870s, the story begins a decade after aristocrat Roger Tichborne has vanished at sea, when his family sends its black servant, Bogle (John Kani), to Australia to search for him. Feeling ill-treated […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Truebooks

What Women Need to Know: From Headaches to Heart Disease and Everything in Between, by Marianne Legato, MD, and Carol Colman (Simon & Schuster, $23). Synopsis: Real questions from real women–Do underwire bras cause cancer? Is fainting after a big meal normal? Should I stand on my head after intercourse to promote pregnancy? (no, yes, […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Wise Up

To the editors, It seems simplistic to blame the demise of Wisdom Bridge Theatre [July 30] on the reputation of its Rogers Park neighborhood, since the public perception of the area changed very little over the two decades that the theater was active. What did change was the perception of Wisdom Bridge itself, which was […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Trick

An aspiring composer of musicals (Christian Campbell) encounters protracted difficulties trying to have sex with a go-go boy he’s picked up (J.P. Pitoc) in this comedy directed by Jim Fall. I don’t want to oversell its merits, but what’s relatively refreshing about this is that it isn’t another movie about gay men–it’s a movie about […]

Posted inMusic

Alban Gerhardt/Sergio Tiempo/Julia Fischer

The Ravinia Festival relies on heavy hitters like Itzhak Perlman and Yo-Yo Ma to pack its pavilion, but it also has a farm system of sorts: the “Rising Stars” chamber concerts. This decade-old series, which runs from October to April each year, has showcased 144 young musicians; many have gone on to join major orchestras, […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Pioneer Myth

Dear editor: This is in response to Jack Clark’s article “Home Invasion” printed in the 7/30 issue of the Reader. I am a renter in Lincoln Square and share many of Mr. Clark’s ill feelings about the gentrification of this neighborhood. But what Mr. Clark has given us in this article bears a striking resemblance […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl

The impressive directorial debut of actress Joan Chen, who’s appeared in everything from Twin Peaks to The Last Emperor to Heaven and Earth. Adapted from the novella “Tian Yu” by Yan Geling, who collaborated with Chen on the screenplay, and filmed in Tibet, this feature has enraged mainland Chinese government officials–not only because it was […]