Posted inArts & Culture

Elliot Smith

ELLIOTT SMITH Success hasn’t spoiled Elliott Smith: on the new Figure 8 (Dreamworks), his second major-label album, he’s as mopey as ever, moaning and groaning about his romantic troubles, unable to accept responsibility for any of them, and by turns venomous and indifferent: on one song he croons “Everything means nothing to me” over and […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, Irish Repertory of Chicago, at Victory Gardens Theater. Eugene O’Neill asks one thing of artists tackling his grueling autobiographical portrayal of a self-destructive American family: that they speak the truth. It takes two and a half hours, but eventually director Sheldon Patinkin and his impressive cast find that truth. In […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Polwechsel

POLWECHSEL The Austrian quartet Polwechsel treats music like an unfenced field: no sound is off-limits. Double bassist Werner Dafeldecker, cellist Michael Moser, guitarist Burkhard Stangl, and English saxophonist John Butcher (who’s replaced trombonist Radu Malfatti) are best known in avant-garde classical and free-improv circles, but between them they’ve played with turntablists, rock bands, and mellow […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Funk Off

Dear editor, I was quite disappointed by Peter Margasak’s April 28th Post No Bills “Local Record Roundup” review of Funkadesi’s debut full-length CD, Uncut Roots. Being a music critic, I have been following Funkadesi’s development since their inception. Unlike Margasak (whose work I generally respect), I am truly impressed with Funkadesi’s output. Don’t get me […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Getting His Kicks

Among the Thugs Next Theatre Company By Nick Green No sport has claimed as many casualties in the last century as British football. In America–where the sport is called soccer and has a different set of rules and code of conduct for fans–our understanding of British football must come from satellite broadcasts, World Cup games, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago

Can’t go to Africa? Try a concert by Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago instead. With no Spring Festival of Dance this year, this internationally known, long-lived troupe specializing in African and African-American dance and based at Kennedy-King College is producing a north-side concert showing off a new piece by Moustapha Bangora, former choreographer of Les […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Truebooks

The Baby Boon: How Family-Friendly America Cheats the Childless, by Elinor Burkett (Free Press, $25). Synopsis: We live in “childhood apartheid”–benefits like day care and tax breaks showered on parents, with the tab for all those perks shouldered by the childless few, such as the author. Representative quote: “To what extent is reproduction a social […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Tree Studios: Partial Preservation

Dear editor, In response to your article “Success by Design,” April 28, a neat little story about an architectural bookshop that has its origin in a preservationists’ picket line, but in reality ends with a wrecking ball. Mr. Henderson has left out the most interesting part of Wilbert Hasbrouck’s legacy. Ironically, in recent years Wilbert […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Marx Brothers House

Look down practically any block in the city and you’ll see at least one example of the typical Chicago three-flat. A gray stone facade, modestly embellished, fronts a solid red-brick structure with no yard to speak of, though the owners may have squeezed in some landscaping. Outside the dignified old house at 4512 S. King […]

Posted inNews & Politics

TRG Music listings

Music listings are compiled by LAURA KOPEN and RENALDO MIGALDI (classical, fairs and festivals) from information available Tuesday. We advise calling ahead for confirmation. Please send listings information, in-cluding a phone number for use by the public, to Reader Music Listings, 11 E. Illinois, Chicago 60611, or send a fax to 312-828-9926, or send E-mail […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Amma

Sometimes we forget that multiculturalism isn’t just a much funded, much maligned trend in the arts but the way some people live their lives. Hema Rajagopalan, artistic director of the bharatanatyam troupe Natyakalalayam Dance Company, and Jan Bartoszek, artistic director of the modern group Hedwig Dances, have put their heads together on an hour-long piece […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Reader Redeemed

Considering the sort of articles and ads normally published by the Reader, your 5/12/2000 article about Josh Caterer, former lead singer for the Smoking Popes, was a pleasant surprise indeed. I’ve been a Christian for many years. There have been times when I have become deeply depressed when contemplating the numerous flaws of the modern […]

Posted inNews & Politics

News of the Weird

Lead Stories In April, Japan’s Seibotu Raiders easily beat a European team in the finals of the international snowball championship in Finland. Afterward several Japanese players urged Winter Olympics officials to recognize their sport. (Teams start with seven players and 270 snowballs on a field just larger than a tennis court, with some protective barriers; […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Architect

The Architect, Cobalt Ensemble Theatre, at Chicago Dramatists. Like Patrick Marber and Conor McPherson, Scotsman David Greig represents a new generation of playwrights across the Atlantic writing with a confidence, intelligence, and humanity unmatched on this side of the ocean. Here Greig (who also authored the engrossing Europe, performed last year by Mary-Arrchie) offers a […]