Posted inNews & Politics

Shocking Therapy

To the editor: My sincere appreciation to you for publishing, Tori Marlan for superb narrative writing, and Alan Jacobs for his keen insights expressed in the August 11 article “A Most Dangerous Method.” As a fellow in the American Psychological Association (APA) and as a licensed, but not practicing, clinical psychologist, I have witnessed the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Rest of My Story

Dear editor, Regarding Tori Marlan’s cover story “A Most Dangerous Method” and my involvement with both the Holocaust and the reparenting therapist Jacqui Lee Schiff [August 11]. I should like to congratulate Ms. Marlan for a fine piece, and also clear up some misperceptions and omissions in it. The major issue is that Ms. Marlan […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Fine Piece of Glass

Reading Lee Sandlin’s review of Chicago Opera Theater’s Akhnaten [July 28] left me with the need to answer the question posed in the final sentence: you, Lee Sandlin, are the tourist. Like the tourists who appear in Philip Glass’s opera, you come to experience something without even a rudimentary understanding of its history or context. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Hiding Our Light

To the editor, The Reader has always been a gem in Chicago’s lopsided crown of print media offerings, a unique, loamy, wide-ranging paper, replete with surprises, distinguished by its publishing stories that almost never appear anywhere else. Frederick Lowe’s story “The Clutch of Fear” [August 18], which describes the daily insults to which black men […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bucktown Arts Fest

“I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars,” Walt Whitman wrote in “Song of Myself.” But I doubt that the great poet ever imagined women declaiming his verse while walking around in Hawaiian-style “grass” skirts made of paper “leaves” adorned with his words. Nevertheless the Hula Girls, a […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Magic Slim & the Teardrops

MAGIC SLIM & THE TEARDROPS Magic Slim emerged fully formed from the south-side blues circuit in 1975 with the single “Wonder Why” and its B-side, “Teardrop,” recorded for Mean Mistreater–the label run by his drummer at the time, blues DJ Steve Cushing. His first stateside full-length, Grand Slam (Rooster Blues), followed in ’82, and though […]

Posted inNews & Politics

He’s No Commie!

To the editor: Earl Manesky–“bit of a commie,” “sacred human being,” “comrade in arms”–makes his living selling expensive food that few proletarians eat (and many probably can’t afford), which he distributes to stores where virtually no proletarians shop [August 18]. His customers are mostly well-heeled urban professionals, many of whom are active participants in the […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Attention Getters

Tom Friedman at the Museum of Contemporary Art, through October 1 By Fred Camper It’s often claimed that since contemporary artists are heavily influenced by other artists’ work and by current theory, their output is best understood by experts, that the proper interpretation and context of such work can come only from critics and academics. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Squashed Beatle

Thank you J.R. Jones for straightening me out about John Lennon [August 18]. For far too long I’d blindly admired Lennon as a singer, songwriter, and musician, but how radical of you, J.R., to refer to him merely as an entertainer! You nailed it, though; the guy really went Vegas when he started “retailing his […]

Posted inNews & Politics

City File

Do Gautreaux-like programs enabling inner-city residents to move to suburbs help or hurt? According to a July report by Greg Duncan and Jens Ludwig of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research, “While even the best available evidence is somewhat limited, it suggests that moving very low-income families out of public housing […]