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Posted inNews & Politics

Stealing Scenes

Mr. Rosenbaum, Recently I have become frustrated with a phenomenon that you might file under American Isolationism (please correct me if I’ve put words in your mouth) when reading about Ang Lee’s new film (which I haven’t seen since it won’t be out till February 9 in the East Tennessee-Knoxville area), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

City File

“Don’t listen to your children,” advises Catherine Wallace of Skokie in U.S. Catholic (January). “Let them be in their own worlds, undisturbed. It is not healthy for persons the age of parents to get involved in arguments about what kind of birthday cake the Care Bears should make for He-Man.” News you won’t hear from […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Two-Faced Darling

Dear Editors: This letter is in regards to the Rockrgrl Music Conference journal written by Kate Darling [December 15]. In her account of the conference, Ms. Darling (who in her day job is the marketing director for corporate behemoth SFX) mentions how “pissed off” she is when she hears the phrase “women in music.” She […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Ghost Dog, The Way of the Modem

Dear Mr. Rosenbaum, First I’d like to say that I very much enjoyed your “Top 40 Films of 2000” article [January 5]–very intelligent and insightful. Reading your comments on Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, I was slightly puzzled and then anxious for elaboration. In the second paragraph you write: “It’s my impression that […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Dinner For Six

Dinner For Six, at ImprovOlympic. Very rarely do actors submit to constraints like those governing this “improvised romantic comedy”: using fortune-cookie parables as suggestions, the four-woman, four-man team split into couples introduced at a dinner party, then developed through individual scenes. The rules not only force the players to flesh out their characters for an […]

Posted inNews & Politics

He Could Call CUB

He Could Call CUB I read with great interest Rose Spinelli’s December 22 article on her troubles with Ameritech, as I’ve had my own horror story. I lived for six years under the thumb of Bell South and was able to have Internet access and local service for roughly $14 a month. Under Ameritech I […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Don Juan in Hell

DON JUAN IN HELL, ShawChicago, at the Storefront Theater, Gallery 37 Center for the Arts. In November ShawChicago revived Man and Superman, and now the troupe brings its formidable powers of persuasion to the 100-minute fantasia that interrupts the third act of George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 comedy. Literature’s most intellectual dream sequence, Don Juan in […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Screwtape

Screwtape, Tinfish Theatre. Hell has many literary faces, from fiery pits to drab rooms with no exit, but most authors agree that humans help book their own passage. James Forsyth’s loose interpretation of C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters follows a trio of demons as they use subliminal trickery to recruit a young architect (Joel Friend). […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Hypocrites Hit the Jackpot

To the Editors, Harold Henderson’s article (December 8) about the Pokagon Band and gambling operations on Native American reservations was excellent. I can’t help noticing a parallel between the situations of Native Americans in the present-day United States and of Jews in medieval Europe. In many parts of medieval Europe, Jews were prevented from exercising […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

I have a question that has plagued me for a couple of years now. A few years ago I had a history professor who told me about a group of monks called (and this may be spelled wrong, but it sure sounds funny) the flatulents. He told my class they were dedicated to relieving the […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Chicago String Quartet

CHICAGO STRING QUARTET One test of a chamber ensemble’s strength is how quickly the new lineup jells after a change in personnel. Founded in 1995, the Chicago String Quartet has undergone two such transformations–and first violinist Joseph Genualdi, like former Juilliard leader Robert Mann, has used these infusions of new blood to fine-tune his group. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Getting Away With Murder

Getting Away With Murder, New Millennium Theatre Company, at Boxer Rebellion Theater. This nonmusical by longtime collaborators Stephen Sondheim and George Furth closed after 17 performances on Broadway in 1996. Billed then as a “comedy thriller,” it has a clunky script that isn’t particularly funny or suspenseful. The first act is modeled on the classic […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Calendar

Friday 1/12 – Thursday 1/18 JANUARY By Cara Jepsen 12 FRIDAY After 17 years at the Mongol court of Kublai Khan, 13th-century explorer Marco Polo, along with his father and uncle, decided to return to Venice. On the way they escorted a Mongol princess to Iran, where she was to wed a Persian prince. Their […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Suburbia

Suburbia, Circle Theatre. The coffin lid has barely been nailed shut on the Clinton administration, and Eric Bogosian’s exposé of fear and loathing in strip-mall America already feels thoroughly dated. Perhaps that’s SubUrbia’s ultimate destiny: to be another memorial, sandwiched between tattered images of Kurt Cobain and Nintendo in the 90s scrapbook. There’s no question […]