Posted inArts & Culture

Arthur Adams

ARTHUR ADAMS For most of his career, guitarist Arthur Adams has taken his opportunities where he’s found them. In 1959, when an aborted tour with soul singer Gene Allison’s band stranded him in Dallas, the Tennessee native settled there, gigging around town and cutting singles of his own. In ’64 he moved to Los Angeles, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bill Charlap Trio

BILL CHARLAP TRIO It’s been a while since Blue Note Records has hyped a new signing as heavily as Bill Charlap–a consummately tasteful pianist who’s worked in Phil Woods’s quintet since 1995, where his colorful chords mediate between the horns and the rhythm section and his solos display a fine mixture of fire and control. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Taming of the Shrew

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, Oak Park Festival Theatre, Austin Gardens. This is not an easy play to like. Even if you overlook its patriarchal “spare the rod and spoil the wife” philosophy, there are all kinds of other speed bumps–broad physical humor, cartoonish characters, a long, tiresome monologue at the end. By transposing the […]

Posted inFilm

The Best of Both Worlds

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Rating **** Masterpiece Directed by Steven Spielberg Written by Spielberg and Ian Watson With Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law, Frances O’Connor, Brendan Gleeson, William Hurt, Jake Thomas, and the voices of Jack Angel, Ben Kingsley, Meryl Streep, Robin Williams, and Chris Rock. If the best movies are often those that change the […]

Posted inNews & Politics

City File

“Whatever its benefits, professional advertising does not seem to have ushered in an age of cheap doctors, cheap lawyers, or even cheap accountants,” writes Michael Davis in “Perspectives on the Professions” (Spring), newsletter of IIT’s Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions. “If the professions used to be conspiracies in restraint of trade”–as […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Rafael Toral

Rafael Toral Rafael Toral’s Wave Field (Moneyland, 1995) and Violence of Discovery and Calm of Acceptance (Touch, 2001) are two of the most gorgeous records of guitar music made in the past decade–and part of their beauty derives from how far they venture from the familiar language of the guitar. To create the surging ambient […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Petacque’s Big Secret

Dear Editor, To understand Art Petacque, you have to know his secret [Hot Type, July 6]. He was illiterate. And like many adults who cannot read or write, he developed his own coping mechanisms. He had terrific drive, contacts, and reporting skills. But unlike reporters who can read, he couldn’t go into the Sun-Times morgue […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Clouds

CLOUDS, E Pluribus Unum Theatre Company, at the Chase Park auditorium. Michael Frayn’s 1976 play anticipates both the frenetic farce of his 1982 smash Noises Off and the somber political meditation of his 1998 Copenhagen. But it doesn’t successfully integrate either element. Nor does E Pluribus Unum’s inaugural production, directed by Anthony A. Cleaver: this […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Festival of Chicago Authors

Local writers sign their books as part of the 14th annual Celebrate on State Street festival. All events will be at the Borders Books & Music booth at Daley Plaza, Washington and Dearborn. For more information call 312-606-0750. Friday, July 13 Jon Anderson City Watch: Discovering the Uncommon Chicago. 11 AM to 3 PM. Jim […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Retire Rokyo?

To the editor: I enjoyed the excerpts of Dick Ciccone’s book on Mike Royko and look forward to reading the rest of it, once I get through all the column compilations strung together by folks who want to make sure we all know they stayed up late once or twice with “the Big.” But as […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Daniele D’Agaro

DANIELE D’AGARO Saxophonist Daniele D’Agaro sounds like a natural match for great expat bebop trumpeter Benny Bailey on their 1999 album, Hidden Treasures (Nota). The two recorded nine rare compositions by saxophonist Don Byas; D’Agaro does an excellent job evoking the full-bodied tenor sound of the 40s and 50s, even as the swift rhythm section–including […]

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Blue Surge

BLUE SURGE, Goodman Theatre. It’s time for playwright Rebecca Gilman to take a long, hard look at her relationship with the Goodman. While any writer would jump at the chance to see her work produced by such a high-profile institution, Gilman’s three-year stint there seems to have drained all her talent. Her 1999 Goodman debut […]