Posted inArts & Culture

Vladislav Delay, AGF

Finnish producer Vladislav Delay has emerged as one of the more interesting figures in electronic dance music. Early on the former jazz percussionist put hard but minimal beats through subtle workouts, transforming them by introducing digital errors and gentle dubby effects; on recordings from a couple years ago, like Sistol (Phthalo) and Entain (Mille Plateaux), […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Selective Tolerance

Dear editor: The failure of the Chicago Tribune to take any action against Judy Peres for publicly endorsing Not in My Name (Hot Type, May 3) leaves one question in my mind: if she endorsed an organization less agreeable to her colleagues, would they have reacted in a stronger manner? To use an extreme example […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Jack Donahue

Broadway singers generally aren’t very credible jazz-pop vocalists; Jack Donahue is an exception. This handsome University of Virginia alumnus and teacher, whose extensive theatrical credits include the Goodman’s brilliant Floyd Collins and The Ballad of Little Jo at Steppenwolf, has a light, airy, plaintive tenor a la Gino Vannelli or Stevie Wonder. It’s an expressive […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Studs on Subjectivity

Dear Mike: What I like about your column is that it touches on matters others abjure. It causes us to think things we hadn’t thought of before. The case of Judy Peres, the Trib’s medical writer, comes to mind [Hot Type, May 3]. When she signed that petition of the Not in My Name group, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Thank Heaven It Wasn’t 7/11

Thank Heaven It Wasn’t 7/11, Second City. A CTA anthrax scare, a security crackdown aboard an airplane, a firefighter trying to live up to his heroic post-9/11 image, a sheepish Arthur Andersen accountant trying to explain away his actions–these are some of the subjects Second City targets in its fast-paced, frequently hilarious new main-stage revue. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The American Egypt

Unlike familiar mainstream documentaries in which titles and an omniscient narrator tell us what to think about the images, Jesse Lerner’s films create disparities between image and spoken text that encourage the viewer’s active participation. While he focuses on the history of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula–which attempted to secede in the 19th century, had a socialist […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Lonesome

Paul Fejos’s exquisite, poetic 1928 masterpiece about love and estrangement in the big city deserves to be ranked with F.W. Murnau’s Sunrise and King Vidor’s The Crowd from the same period, though it’s not nearly as well-known. Equally neglected is Fejos himself, a peripatetic Hungarian who made striking films in Hungary, Hollywood, Austria, and France […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Chicago Chamber Musicians

More than any American composer since Leonard Bernstein, John Corigliano has an uncanny feel for the popular pulse. Proficient in a wide range of idioms, he responds to the nation’s shifts in mood rather than adhere to an orthodoxy. As if answering the prayers of concertgoers frustrated with atonal music, he’s written sonatas, quartets, and […]