Posted inArts & Culture

Perpetua

Perpetua, BackStage Theatre Company, at the Cornelia Arts Building. Inventive movement, terrific ensemble work, and the affecting use of chants mark this original adaptation of the journal of an early Christian martyr. The second act also boasts some bright moments of levity: Perpetua has a vision of herself in a Roman arena that closely resembles […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Straight Dope

If the philosopher Martin Heidegger was a Nazi and an anti-Semite up until his death in 1976, why do we continue to revere the ground he walked on? The guy was a louse (he seduced Hannah Arendt of all people) and yet he is considered the major voice of postmodern thought! Why was this morally […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Fantasticks and I Do! I Do!

The Fantasticks, Pegasus Players, and I Do! I Do!, Drury Lane Theatre Evergreen Park. Ideally, courtship and marriage are different phases of the same great experience. The challenge lovers face–to embrace their differences while retaining the romance–fuels these small-scale musicals by composer Harvey Schmidt and lyricist/book writer Tom Jones. The earlier and vastly more popular […]

Posted inMusic

Everyone Comes Out To Play

Phrenology at the Hungry Brain, September 8-10 When the Hungry Brain hosts jazz on Sunday nights, the music onstage sometimes competes with the conversation in the crowd. If there had been any such struggle in the small bar as Design Flaw performed earlier this month, bassist Brian Dibblee’s soft new trio would have easily lost. […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Calendar

Friday 9/27 – Thursday 10/3 SEPTEMBER 27 FRIDAY In 1985 Alaska (aka Olvido Gara), a Mexico City-born, Madrid-bred sexpot, ditched her teenage punk-rock roots to front Dinarama, a chart-topping synth-pop band. Dinarama broke up in 1989, but original members Alaska and Nacho Canut continued to make music as the much darker, more electronic Fangoria. The […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Flicker of an Expiring Candle

Flicker of an Expiring Candle, Side Project, at the Side Studio. Sara Berry Short’s world-premiere murder mystery is an intriguing but frustratingly unrealized blend of classic noir and classical history. The antics of third-century polyamorous Roman emperor Elagabalus form the backdrop for Short’s script, which also owes a huge debt to Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie. Angus, […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Food Service

Fern Bogot was photographed by Leah Missbach in April 2000 as part of the CITY 2000 photodocumentary project. I interviewed her the following September in her home, which was liberally decorated with food-related tchotchkes. My name is Fern Taylor Bogot. At the moment the picture was shot, I was celebrating the Jewish holiday of Passover […]

Posted inFilm

8 Women

Abourgeois factory owner is found lying in bed with a knife in his back, and the finger of guilt passes from one occupant of his richly appointed home to another: his coolly fashionable wife (Catherine Deneuve), his beautiful and willful daughters (Virginie Ledoyen and Ludivine Sagnier), his morally loose sister (Fanny Ardant), his miserly mother-in-law […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Underwater Football

Julie Caffey’s autobiographical piece about her rocky relationship with her disgruntled older brother and reclusive father doesn’t take long to reach its inevitable conclusion: who we really are is who our parents made us. Water is the dominant motif: framing her tale with the biblical story of Jonah, she suggests the importance of destiny and […]

Posted inMusic

Eliane Radigue

An increasing number of musicians pander to the public’s dwindling attention span, but there are still some folks who like to take their time. French electronic composer Eliane Radigue is one; if you want to get anything out of her work, you’ll have to surrender yourself to it for more than an hour. During the […]

Posted inFilm

The Fog of War

The Four Feathers ** (Worth seeing) Directed by Shekhar Kapur Written by Michael Schiffer and Hossein Amini With Heath Ledger, Wes Bentley, Kate Hudson, Djimon Hounsou, and Michael Sheen. The sun never sets on The Four Feathers: since its publication in 1902, A.E.W. Mason’s adventure novel, about a British officer who’s branded a coward and […]

Posted inArts & Culture

All The Way Home

All the Way Home, Griffin Theatre Company. Tad Mosel’s 1961 Pulitzer-winning Broadway play faithfully re-creates the tone of James Agee’s taut, clear-eyed, unsentimental autobiographical novel, A Death in the Family. The central event in both works may be the untimely death of Agee’s father, but Mosel handles it the way Agee does, as one incident […]