Posted inMusic

Tony Conrad

Between 1962 and 1965, Tony Conrad played violin in the Theatre of Eternal Music, a radical group convened by composer La Monte Young. Its raw, droning “dream music” spurred the development of minimalism and influenced bands from the Velvet Underground to Sonic Youth, but for decades the Theatre itself (or the Dream Syndicate, as Conrad […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Eyedea & Abilities

When Mike Averill, aka Eyedea, declares near the top of his new Rhymesayers release, First Born, that “It’s time to clean MTV out of your ears,” I’m inclined to take him seriously–in order to maintain creative control of this album, his first with DJ and producer Abilities (ne Gregory Keltgen), the 19-year-old Minneapolis MC turned […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Dancing Across State Lines

Chicago’s Zephyr Dance again shares a bill with an out-of-town company for its eighth annual “Dancing Across State Lines” program. Perhaps in keeping with the current mood of retrenchment, Zephyr has kept its own new offerings small: two solos, one by artistic director Michelle Kranicke and the other by associate artistic director Emily Stein, who […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Jane Siberry

Jane Siberry began her career in the early 1980s as an acoustic troubadour in the coffeehouses of her native Toronto. She’s never lost her folkie’s love for heart-on-the-sleeve storytelling, but like fellow Canadian Leonard Cohen she now couches those stories in glossy, layered arrangements that enhance her imagery and add complexity and ambiguity to its […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Low Sodium’s Low Blow

[Re: Culture Club, November 2] Aaron Haber has stated to the press that Jessi Hill personally is responsible for Stage Left’s “unreasonable” demands. If one visits Low Sodium’s Web site, one finds Jessi Hill portrayed as a tyrant who is manipulating Stage Left company members into mindlessly spouting her script of artistic snobbery. Anyone who […]

Posted inArts & Culture

1,001 Afternoons in Chicago

Anyone who missed Prop Theatre Group’s rambunctious 1997 salute to Chicago newspaper legend Ben Hecht gets a second chance with this rich revival. Based on the daily columns Hecht churned out from 1921 to 1923, this sprawling 150-minute work is rife with the colorful slang of the time, though some things haven’t changed: innocent people […]

Posted inMusic

Who Got the Stones Rolling?

Stoned: A Memoir of London in the 1960s By Andrew Loog Oldham (St. Martin’s Press) In the annals of rock history, artist managers are rarely recognized for their creative vision. Their behind-the-scenes manipulations may be well documented, but we prefer to think of them as scheming, greedy, and shallow (and preferably old and fat). That […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Schulter Can’t Shut Us Up!

Dear Editor: As active members of COW (Community Organizing Works!) and 47ward.org, we take a special interest in your recent story “War of Words” [October 26]. Over the past few years we have taken part in public activities–leafleting, organizing, protesting–intended to address the housing crisis in the 47th Ward. Although Alderman Schulter’s lawsuit attempts to […]

Posted inColumns & Opinion

Savage Love

I am a 25-year-old bisexual female grad student in NYC. This summer I had sex with a man for the first time. It was casual sex, but we were together for a few days. I was spending the summer in California and met him there; he now lives in Philadelphia. Today I called him up […]

Posted inArts & Culture

What a Fool Believes

What a Fool Believes, Cest La Vie Drama Club of Chicago, at the Heartland Studio Theater. Watching Brian LaDuca’s first playwriting effort for his new company is like looking at a stranger’s college photos–it’s an occasionally nostalgic but mainly tedious exercise. Recent grad Brett (the overemoting Jeremy Harrison) has been dumped by his college girlfriend, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Style of Sympathy

Style of Sympathy, Side Project, at the Side Studio. The crooked cop is nothing new–you’ll find the equivalent in Shakespeare’s Dogberry or in Plautus’s Miles Gloriosus. And that’s the problem with Christopher Williams’s noirish police drama: he spends too much time showing us how crooked his trio of cops are when what makes them interesting […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Plenty of Presses

While we genuinely admire their dedication, we were rather surprised to read that Michael O’Leary and Devin Johnston think that “there are a lot of good presses in Chicago, but most of them are associated with universities, except for the Guild Complex” [October 26]. I think they should know that while there are a handful […]