Posted inNews & Politics

Just Like All the Rest

The kindest thing I can say about Liz Phair’s eponymous new album–her first in nearly five years–is that it’s easy to forget. Produced primarily by the Matrix, the trio of former pop musicians (including a refugee from Haircut 100) responsible for Avril Lavigne’s hits, the disc’s relentlessly radio-friendly tracks are as mundane as advertising jingles […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Snowed by the Management

I read with interest your column on the labor situation at the [Baltimore] Sun [Hot Type, June 27]. As a former reporter and editorial writer with 22 years of dealing with the Sun’s management, I think you gave management much too much credit for telling the truth. The quote from Linda Geeson about work rules […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Trust Me on This

Trust Me on This, Lifeline Theatre. The publicity for Alan Donahue’s adaptation of Donald E. Westlake’s 1988 whodunit emphasizes its setting in the cutthroat world of tabloid journalists–whose unscrupulous tactics to meet their quota of scandal are nowadays neither shocking nor titillating. But time has not diminished the seductive intricacy of Westlake’s grotesquely comic thriller. […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Fact Is, They’re Great

Hi Pete– Interesting article on the street fairs [Post No Bills, June 20]. Nice to know that the community organizations are stepping up to the plate and taking the events to “the next level,” so to speak. Wanted to draw reference to your postscript item of June 20 and then make a quick comment about […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Sherman Alexie

Over the last decade Spokane/Coeur d’Alene Indian Sherman Alexie has busily made a name for himself as both a writer and an uncompromising advocate for Native American concerns. His dozen or so novels, short-story collections, volumes of poetry, and screenplays have dealt with historic and contemporary oppression of Indians, the quest for identity, the pitfalls […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Sports Section

What was I saying about the White Sox being dangerous? The Sox turned on the Cubs like a wounded animal in their home-and-home series, winning the first two games at Wrigley Field two weeks ago before the Cubs salvaged the finale, and doing the same last weekend at Sox Park. These series were a source […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bounce

Bounce, Goodman Theatre. The first collaboration in more than 20 years between Stephen Sondheim and Harold Prince–the composer-director team responsible for Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, and Sweeney Todd–is a major disappointment. This saga of fortune-seeking brothers Addison and Wilson Mizner, whose escapades from the 1890s to the 1930s “bounce” them repeatedly from rags […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Take Him to the River

Dear Reader: In the June 27 issue there was an item on Joe Royer [Calendar] that mentioned something about Mr. Royer viewing the Calumet River near 49th and the Stevenson Expressway, as well as an adjacent power plant. The Calumet River is located on Chicago’s east side, approximately ten miles from the site in question. […]

Posted inMusic

Spot Check

AFRICAN/CARIBBEAN international FESTIVAL OF LIFE 7/3-6, WASHINGTON PARK Much more than a music festival, this annual event is a sort of giant block party, with food, arts and crafts, workshops, activities for children, and plenty of networking and leafleting. The musical lineup is wildly diverse–there just aren’t many places to see South African reggae artist […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Life Changers

Peter, I’ve been following the music scene in Chicago for 20-plus years. To call Hello Dave “unoriginal” is like calling the Rolling Stones a “one-hit wonder” [Post No Bills, June 20]. I imagine you get E-mails like this all the time. I mean no contempt or obsessive critique, but I thought this was worth a […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bardo Pond

Bardo Pond’s album titles are quick to promise the listener a trippy good time–Bufo Alvarius is named for a toad that secretes a hallucinogenic venom, Amanita for a genus of mushroom. I’m especially partial to their overlooked 2001 release Dilate, which adds a few cantering folk-rock outings to the Philly quintet’s trademark compositions of dense, […]