Posted inArts & Culture

Fuddy Meers

FUDDY MEERS, Strawdog Theatre Company. All the characters in David Lindsay-Abaire’s comedy are loopy, whether a little or a lot. Severe trauma has left Claire with a fresh case of amnesia every morning: she absorbs information and has flashes of memory, but everything is forgotten the next day. Claire’s mother has a speech impediment because […]

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Sharrie Williams

At age 14 Sharrie Williams appeared on an album by the Soul Choir; a few years later, in the late 80s, she toured as a featured soloist with the Greater Williams Temple Inspirational Voices, a choir based at her church in Saginaw, Michigan. She even cut a record with that group that was produced by […]

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Calendar

Friday 6/25 – Thursday 7/1 JUNE 25 FRIDAY Fashion designers have long defended the unwearable creations they send down the catwalk by claiming they are art. Now some of the more extreme pieces from over the years are going on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art. The exhibit Skin Tight: The Sensibility of the […]

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Serendipity

SERENDIPITY, at Frankie J’s MethaDome Theater. Arik Martin’s taut, grotesque hostage drama may become the Arsenic and Old Lace of the Chicago fringe–it’s gotten three productions in three years. The first two typified the off-off-Loop scene: the playwright directed his own script with his own scrappy company in its own tiny space. But now another […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Wilco: Shut Up and Sing

Why is Chicago’s music media so obsessed with the dysfunctional family that is the band Wilco [“Wilco: Are We Out of the Woods Yet?” June 11]? I like their records–in fact I truly loved Yankee Hotel Foxtrot–but I don’t lose sleep over which guitarist is getting fired this week or which international conglomerate music company […]

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What Am I Driving At?

“Golf is a good walk spoiled.” –Mark Twain “Stupida fucking game.” –Furio on The Sopranos I’ve always thought an athlete’s carriage, demeanor, and, of course, performance say more than the athlete could ever hope to put into words in an interview. In many ways, an athlete is the person he or she is in action; […]

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Hamlet

HAMLET, First Folio Shakespeare Festival. Straightforward and fast-paced, Alison C. Vesely’s earnest open-air staging is an excellent introduction to the Danish tragedy’s tale of idealism mired in indecision, corruption, and guilt. Vesely reconfirms the banality of evil as she gently exposes one man’s failure to act until he’s finally fighting for his life. This production […]

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Mum

Reykjavik’s Mum like to compose and record their drifting, amorphous music in remote lighthouses and coastal weather stations. A trio since the departure of cellist-vocalist Gyda Valtysdottir in the fall of 2002, they’ve lately muted the once pronounced electronic elements of their sound. Although warm synthetic tones and glitchy beats intermittently gurgle and sputter on […]

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Supernatural Chicago

SUPERNATURAL CHICAGO, at Excalibur. Necromancer Neil Tobin shares some well-known stories of Chicago’s spirit life in this one-man show, performed in the narrow attic of the reputedly haunted nightclub Excalibur. Adopting a simple lecture format complete with illustrations on easels, Tobin tells tales of the city’s famous undead: the Italian Bride, Resurrection Mary, Al Capone […]

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Juilliard String Quartet

The Juilliard String Quartet, one of the finest American ensembles for more than 50 years, has chosen a program of Haydn, Beethoven, and Bartok that reminds us how critical each composer was to the string quartet as serious music. Haydn took it from the living room to the concert hall, Beethoven raised its stature to […]

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Heaven Can Wait

Ernst Lubitsch’s only completed film in Technicolor (1943), the greatest of his late films, offers a rosy, meditative, and often very funny view of an irrepressible ladies’ man (Don Ameche in his prime) presenting his life in retrospect to the devil (Laird Cregar). Like a good deal of Lubitsch from The Merry Widow on, it’s […]

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The Last Sunday in June

THE LAST SUNDAY IN JUNE, Bailiwick Repertory. In this comedy Jonathan Tolins pokes gentle fun at the cliches of gay plays: men gather for some event in an apartment or beach house, where they banter, bicker, and whine. Then a shirtless–or naked–character drops by, someone has sex, and somebody dies. The Last Sunday in June […]