Posted inNews & Politics

Seek and Ye Shall Find

Can you find the nose on your face? How about your own name in an index? We couldn’t. Harold Henderson’s piece “Off the Record” (November 12) said the Reader wasn’t mentioned in the new Encyclopedia of Chicago. But we are, right there on page 439, in the Journalism entry. We apologize for the error.

Posted inArts & Culture

Quality Street

The anguish of aging runs through James M. Barrie’s seemingly playful dramas. If Peter Pan celebrates eternal youth, his equally bittersweet Quality Street defies time’s ravages to offer the reassurance of a second chance at love. Barrie’s 1901 homage to Jane Austen’s Persuasion is a Napoleonic-era caprice: a seemingly spurned lady wins back a long-lost […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Mrs. Warren’s Profession

After attempts at writing novels and melodramas, George Bernard Shaw found solid footing with this 1893 critique of hypocrisy within polite society. Mrs. Warren–an entrepreneur who’s filled her coffers by franchising brothels throughout Europe–remains one of Shaw’s sharpest female creations, a huge ripple in his usual stream of dowdy spinsters and petulant schoolgirls. In keeping […]

Posted inArts & Culture

The Second City’s 45th Anniversary Tour

While not the towering retrospective that the title suggests, this is a finely tuned revue of sketches from the Second City’s vast repertoire plus a smidgen of improv. Director Jim Carlson mixes and matches an impressive variety of diverse but identifiable characters: the ingenue (Rebecca Sage Allen), hunk (Alex Fendrich), imp (Nicky Margolis), Belushi-ish dude […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Teibele and Her Demon

Adapter Eve Friedman stretches Isaac Bashevis Singer’s ten-page fable into three hours, an approach perfectly suited to making the audience feel it’s trapped in a Marc Chagall painting. It’s a shame that the European Repertory Company, directed by Zeljko Djukich, expends so much intelligence and energy on this uninteresting piece of folklore. Shtetl Poland comes […]

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Young Playwrights Festival

The four one-acts in Pegasus Players’ 19th annual festival seem subtler and more sophisticated–less tin-eared and less prone to ham-fisted didacticism–than the scripts of festivals past. Imani Josey in Grace never gets preachy as she tells the story of a young woman who learns the dangers of swimming with the sharks. And Nikhar Ahmed in […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Antimatter Bonecrusher

Though local MC Antimatter Bonecrusher (Rashad Abdul-Salaam) lets his ego take the wheel from time to time, at least he knows he’s doing it. He both flaunts and devalues his education (he has a master’s in social science from the U. of C.), jokingly tosses off rhymes about his methodology (“Not to sound too modest […]

Posted inNews & Politics

CHA Screen Test

Dear editor, I appreciate the Reader’s mention of the Chicago Housing Authority in the recent article [“Paradise Lost,” November 26] about Jim Fuerst’s new book, When Public Housing Was Paradise. However, I’d like to take this opportunity to clarify a few ongoing misconceptions about CHA’s Plan for Transformation which were included in the commentary. We […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Days of Being Wild

Wong Kar-wai’s idiosyncratic style first became apparent in this gorgeously moody second feature (1991), whose romantic vision of 1960 Hong Kong as a network of unfulfilled longings would later echo through In the Mood for Love. Leslie Cheung, Hong Kong’s answer to James Dean (in fact the movie appropriates its Cantonese title from Rebel Without […]