Posted inArts & Culture

The Wrong Men

Taryn Simon’s exhibit of large-format photographs has its roots in an assignment from the New York Times Magazine in 2000. The magazine asked her to photograph a handful of wrongfully convicted men who’d been on death row. Simon found that while some were angry and others were forgiving, all had been devastated. “They would tell […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Have Some Respect

Dear editor, In the midst of reading Bert Stabler’s semi-amusing critique of Chris Uphues’s MCA exhibit, I was suddenly brought to a full-throttle stop upon reading the following line: “Happy Shower and Deathstar also hint at traditional abstraction, suggesting Picasso and Paul Klee, though both these modernists added some violent, esoteric mysticism to their semifigurative […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Amy Ray, the Organ

If you say somebody’s new album is way more gay than the last one, it’s hardly ever a compliment. But Indigo Girl AMY RAY has dedicated her second solo disc, Prom (Daemon), entirely to questions of queer identity–and this record isn’t just gay, it’s fiercely, fantastically gay. It’s about the drama and tumult of high […]

Posted inNews & Politics

The Old Thesaurus Maneuver

After drudging through “ProtestWarrior” Justin Fleming’s tortured syntax and clumsy run-ons [Letters, August 26], it occurred to me: of all the rhetorical tactics that right-wingers have adopted recently to feign intelligence, hitting up the thesaurus every three words for a longer adjective is among the least effective I’ve seen. Jeff Knight Edgewater

Posted inNews & Politics

The Truth Hurts

As a student at DePaul I took a class with Professor Norman Finkelstein [“Whose Holocaust Is It Anyway?” August 26]. Finkelstein was a professional who took his work and teaching as seriously as his dedication to justice. To illustrate a point in class he once talked about a movie where a lawyer must defend her […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Don’t Hold Back

Hello Bert Stabler, I just read your article on Chris Uphues’s MCA exhibit [“Cutting-Edge Without the Edge,” September 9] and wanted to thank you for your sensitive writing and candor. Of course, the conceptual scope of the 12 by 12 curation is pretty narrow. If one were to judge Chicago artists by what is presented […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Soundtrack City Chicago

There’s no denying “human beatbox” Yuri Lane’s mad skills or freakish repertoire of rhythms and sounds. And his best bit–a heavy-beats-and-harmonica blues fusion–is a real barn burner. But if 90 minutes of his guy-from-Police Academy meets the Fat Boys shtick strikes you as a recipe for mime-level annoyance too, no amount of chops is gonna […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Bikerman and the Jewish Avenger

Creating a sort of “Odd Couple Live” experience, unlikely best friends Scott Woldman, a Jewish preppy English teacher, and Jim Jarvis, a beer-swilling, knife-wielding south-sider, share tales from their lives, choosing from a repertoire that includes bear-hunting adventures, a doomed eighth-grade ski trip, and the treatise “Why I Don’t Date Chicks From the North Shore.” […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Nutty Professors

In regards to the Reader’s cover story entitled “Whose Holocaust Is It Anyway?” [August 26], one may have noticed the infantile way in which the two academics take stabs at each others’ personal lives and their academic work. The main topic that these two professors debate on is the Holocaust; one apparently claims that modern-day […]