Posted inArts & Culture

The Empire Builders

The Right Brain Project, dedicated to “lesser known pieces whether modern or classic,” shows excellent taste by debuting with Boris Vian’s rarely produced absurdist gem. In this vicious 1959 satire of bourgeois self-delusion, an upstanding family flee up one floor in their tenement whenever they hear a menacing, unidentifiable noise. Once resettled, they quickly forget […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Hope for Property Tax Reform

We’d like to thank the Reader and Mr. Joravsky for covering the public budget hearings that the city holds every year [The Works, September 9]. It is a unique opportunity for the average citizen to express their opinions directly to our city government and to Mayor Daley. We appreciated the opportunity and were encouraged by […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Ruby Moon

Maybe the lonely, isolated, eccentric couple in Matt Cameron’s play about an abducted child are desperate with grief. Or maybe they’re crazy. At any rate, Cameron is so obsessed with gimmicks that neither his characters nor the audience can truly enter the dark heart of despair. David Almaral and Nancy Friedrich play all the characters, […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Only You

Timothy Mason’s 1988 bedroom farce about five eccentric young adults looking for love (and the deus ex machina who unites them) feels dated and dry. And the young performers in this debut staging by Rubicon Theatre Project never manage to reach beyond themselves to connect with the other actors–sometimes it feels as if they’re performing […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Aloft Aerial Dance

Somehow I had the impression that aerial dance was all about the feats. Boy, was I wrong. In an hour-long piece called Rolling Blackouts, choreographer-director Shayna Swanson takes a somewhat ragtag group of 12 performers and molds their vignettes on rings, trapezes, silks, and bungee cords into a meditation on the perils and pleasures of […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Savage Judgment

After perusing the Dan Savage column, in which he seems to fancy himself as the Ann Landers for those folks engaged in perverse sexual lifestyles, I can only reach the following conclusion: I would hate to be Dan Savage on Judgment Day when he is asked, “How could you have cast a benign eye on […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Paper Work

Jae Ko’s 22 bold abstract sculptures at Andrew Bae, made of long rolls of adding-machine tape soaked in water and ink, have their origins in a seven-year depression. After getting art degrees in Korea and Japan, Ko moved to Washington, D.C., in 1988; she married a Korean-American in 1990. She’d been raised in an unusual […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Rhinoceros Theater Festival

This annual showcase of experimental theater, performance, and music runs through 10/31 at Prop Thtr, 3502-4 N. Elston. Rhino Fest is coordinated by the Curious Theatre Branch and features emerging and established artists from Chicago’s fringe. Performances take place in Prop’s north or south theaters. Admission for most shows is $15 or “pay what you […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Alphabet Report

Word-drunk writer-performer Barrie Cole is incapable of using language straightforwardly. Even when she’s rattling off her lists of tangential associations with letters of the alphabet–the show’s opening gambits for her and fellow performer Julie Caffey–Cole’s eccentric lists are dizzying. Caffey alternately grounds Cole when she gets too out there and ventures into outer space herself […]

Posted inColumns & Opinion

Savage Love

I’m a 21-year-old straight guy with a boring, straight sex life. Until a few months ago, when something terrifying happened. Back in May I was contacted by somebody through Match.com. She claimed to be a grad student at my school and had a very attractive photo, and we began IMing. She talked about how she […]

Posted inArts & Culture

Galileo

Without epic theatricality, Brecht’s emblematic plays can shrink to facile morality lessons. Director Christopher J. Berens reduces Brecht’s 1947 quasi-Marxist retooling of Galileo’s life–a brash, sweeping saga depicting his headstrong struggle to publish scripture-defying scientific discoveries despite threats from the Inquisition–to a measured chamber drama. Brecht created a morally ambiguous title character, part genius, part […]