Posted inArts & Culture

Discovery Channel, Ichor, White/Blue, and An Elegy for Julian Grace

Of the four short plays in this production, only Shawn Pfautsch’s Ichor is worth recommending. Directed by Nic Dimond and featuring Staci Stoltz and Mike Griggs, this funny, provocative piece about a robot experiencing existential angst explores scientific progress in terms of ego, memory, emotion, and family relationships. But an entertaining, intriguing 20 minutes can’t […]

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Tegan and Sara

On the page, the foundering love affairs Tegan and Sara Quin chronicle are merely reminders of how wrought with anguish a person’s early 20s can be. Sung, however, their lyrics take on a tone of restless self-discovery so affecting you might wax nostalgic for the days when every doomed relationship seemed like a puzzle you […]

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Seascape

In Edward Albee’s whimsical Pulitzer-winning drama, two diametric couples on a beach reflect on human nature. Nancy and Charlie, mired in midlife crises and the challenge of living in the present, are obsessed with doing things to prove they’re happy. They conjure up escapist fantasies of living beneath the sea, a fantasy realized by Leslie […]

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Dave Douglas & Keystone

Trumpeter Dave Douglas organizes so many bands it’s almost irritating. I wish he’d spend more time with one of them–Nomad, Tiny Bell Trio, Charms of the Night Sky–to see where it might go. But his records are consistently good to great, and the new Keystone (Greenleaf) is no exception. Once again Douglas is experimenting with […]

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Jamie Lidell

On his first solo album, 2000’s Muddlin Gear (Warp), Jamie Lidell hid behind walls of squelchy noise and dirty beats–it was the sort of in-your-face postelectronica record that a California nutjob like Lesser or Kid606 might release. Working with fellow producer Christian Vogel as Super Collider, he let his vocals peek through: on their 1999 […]

Posted inNews & Politics

Snips

[snip] Not-so-intelligent design. “Would an intelligent designer create millions of species and then make them go extinct, only to replace them with other species, repeating this process over and over again?” asks the University of Chicago’s Jerry Coyne in the New Republic. “Would an intelligent designer produce animals having a mixture of mammalian and reptilian […]

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Eat and . . . Should We Put It Out? (The Smoke)

Instead of Eat, the Asbestos Theatre Project is performing three unnamed “plays” (really more like scenes) that explore whether redemption is possible when human beings inhabit such profane bodies. The fluid Kate Teichman and the cringing Stephen Mosblech put themselves through various forms of agonized contortion, which are hard to watch if sometimes interesting. But […]

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Separate Lies

Screenwriter Julian Fellowes (Gosford Park, Vanity Fair) makes his directing debut with this devastating drama about a hit-and-run in a country village that takes the life of an old man and forever changes a coldhearted London solicitor (Tom Wilkinson), his beautiful wife (Emily Watson), and their blue-blooded neighbor (Rupert Everett). At 85 minutes the movie […]

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The Treatment

Friday 7 FIERY FURNACES New York’s Fiery Furnaces are about to follow up last year’s grandiose and excellent Blueberry Boat with Rehearsing My Choir (Rough Trade/Sanctuary), which ought to baffle even their most ardent fans. A collaboration between siblings Matt and Eleanor Friedberger and their 83-year-old grandmother, Olga Sarantos, Choir is a rambling, fanciful near […]

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Echoes of Another Man

It would be easy to ding Mia McCullough’s new play for its resemblance to other sci-fi surgery stories, particularly Flowers for Algernon. But she wastes little time on moralizing about medical ethics in this deeply humane tale about implanting the brain of a famous–and famously dysfunctional–artist in a comatose pro golfer in order to keep […]